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There are couple of ways to access azure storage services. And I wanted to know from the experts:

  • Which is the recommended way for accessing azure storage services?
  • What are the pros/cons of either? (like performance, no of requests…)

Windows Azure Storage Client Library Class Library OR Windows Azure Storage Services REST API

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4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

If you are familiar with .NET and feel more comfortable in coding in e.g. C# then the Storage Client Library abstracts all the REST API calls from you and makes your life easier :)

Storage Client Library

Pros - easy of use, .NET, good community support

Cons - none that I'm aware of

The REST interface is excellent and can give you a more native way to write interoperable code at the REST/HTTP layer

Pros - interop e.g. devices, platforms, languages

Cons - complexity IMO

HTH

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I think storage client is the way to go, go with REST if your uncomfortable with .net libs. I am still doing some investigation if i come across any info will update. –  nakago Jul 10 '12 at 3:39

The other answers are helpful, but on a technical note, there's exactly one way to access Windows Azure storage, and that's via its only API (REST). The .NET storage client library is one of many available libraries you can use to call that API.

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This depends on your environment. If you're using .NET, Node, Java, PHP or Python I suggest you take a look on the Windows Azure website since there's an SDK for all these environments, which is much easier than using the REST api (underneath the SDK still uses the REST api):

  • You don't have to handle the low level REST API
  • The SDK is built by the Windows Azure team, they have the most knowledge of how to best use the REST API
  • For the number of requests, most of the time you are in control in both scenarios (batching for table storage, getting multiple messages from queue, ...).

Now, keep in mind that the REST api will always have the new features first, and it can take a while before these are implemented in the SDKs. But still, you can follow the repositories on GitHub to get the newest versions (the 1.7.1 .NET SDK is here while the 'official' release is still 1.7).

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If you just want to access your Azure Storage, just download FREE 3rd party application and configure your Azure Storage using "Storage Name" and "Storage Key" and you are good to go. Here is a list of a few applications:

  1. Azure Storage Explorer
  2. CloudXplorer
  3. CloudBerry Azure Storage Explorer

If you want to get your hands dirty and use Azure Storage Client API, here is a full example code.

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