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I want to create 1MB String for benchmark,so I writed code as follow:

public final static long KB     = 1024;
public final static long MB     = 1024 * KB;
public static void main(String[] args){
    String text_1MB=createString(1*MB);
}
static String createString(long size){
    StringBuffer o=new StringBuffer();
    for(int i=0;i<size;i++){
        o.append("f");
    }
    return o.toString();
}

I feel that this method createString is not good and stupid

Any idea to optimize the createString method?

share|improve this question
    
Note that that string would be 2 MiB in size. – Joey Jun 19 '12 at 11:04
    
hi @Joey ,What's the meaning of "2 MiB in size"? – Zenofo Jun 19 '12 at 11:19
1  
It's a string consisting of 1048576 character, each of which is a UTF-16 code unit. Therefore your string doesn't have 1 MiB but 2. – Joey Jun 19 '12 at 11:23
up vote 12 down vote accepted

How about:

char[] chars = new char[size];
// Optional step - unnecessary if you're happy with the array being full of \0
Arrays.fill(chars, 'f');
return new String(chars);
share|improve this answer
1  
I think using Arrays class is clever since it calls a method only once while the Append method of another class has to be called many times. – The Original Android Jun 19 '12 at 8:06

You can simply create a large character array.

char[] data = new char[1000000];

If you need to make a real String object, you can:

String str = new String(data);
share|improve this answer
    
The OP is already not using += in a loop - the code in the question uses StringBuffer. – Jon Skeet Jun 19 '12 at 8:07

Create a character array and use new String(char[]) constructor.

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char[] s = new char[1024 * 1000];
String str = String.copyValueOf(s);
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How about using class StringBuilder instead of StringBuffer? StringBuilder should be faster since it is not synchronized unlike StringBuffer.

Perhaps you can increase performance by setting the compiler flags to increase the Heap memory and Virtual memory. It can not hurt certainly.

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Use StringBuilder and set the capacity:

static String createString(long size){
    StringBuilder o=new StringBuilder(size);
    for(int i=0;i<size;i++){
        o.append("f");
    }
    return o.toString();
}
share|improve this answer

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