Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am working with X509 certificates in Java. Given a certificate is it possible to find all other certificates in the signing hierarchy until you reach the root certificate?

I have a certificate file (with a .cer extension) and I want to extract the parent signing certificate. I want to keep finding the parent of that certificate untill I get the final root certificate, which is self signed.

I have checked the X509Certificate certificate APIs and relevant APIs in java.security.cert but could not find anything useful.

share|improve this question
1  
1  
There's no reliable way to do this. See my answer on stackoverflow.com/a/11076955/47961 –  Eugene Mayevski 'EldoS Corp Jun 19 '12 at 9:15
1  
Did you try java.security.KeyStore#getCertificateChain() ? –  Zaki Jun 19 '12 at 11:36

1 Answer 1

That is not hard - assuming you've somehow/out of band got all the intermediate certificates and the root cert in one or more keychains.

Have a look at

http://codeautomate.org/blog/2012/02/certificate-validation-using-java/

for a code snipped which does just that. The key bit is in validateKeyChain() and basically consists of

   cert = cert-to-validate
   while(not self signed) {
       extract issuer from cert
       scan keychain(s) to find cert with a subject equal to the issuer
       if none found - error
       check if the signature is correct.
       cert = issuers_cert
   }
   if not at the top/root - error

As to how you get the intermediate/root certificates - that is a different issue. Note that this code is a little bit naive - and does not quite understand cross-signing. The java pkix calls though though - BouncyCastle has an example.

You can generally build the root certs into a key chain; but the intermediate certificates often need to be 'gathered' or discovered more dynamically. This generally requires querying the SSL stack during TLS or similar.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.