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What is the standard behavior in cases when function throws exception not in valid exception list ? For example when I run this code:

#include <iostream>
#include <cstdlib>

using namespace std;

void NotLegal() throw(char) {
    throw 42;
}

void myunexpected () {
  cout << "exception not in list\n";
  cin.get();
  exit(0);
}

int main()
{
    set_unexpected(myunexpected);

    try {
       NotLegal();
   }
   catch(...) {
       cout << "exception catched";
       cin.get();
   }

   return 0;
}

It behaves differently on GCC and Visual Studio C++ compilers:

  • On VS 2010 not expected exception is catched in general exception handler.
  • On GCC unexpected() handler function is called instead of catching exception.

Why is this difference ? Why MS C++ compiler doesn't calls unexpected() callback ?

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1  
did you try to change your example? Just to be sure that you will not get an automatic convertion between 42 and a char. Just try throw() instead of throw(char). –  Alessandro Teruzzi Jun 19 '12 at 8:54
    
it's the same with empty exception list. –  Agnius Vasiliauskas Jun 19 '12 at 8:59

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The documentation for set_unexpected calls out this behaviour:

Remarks

...

The C++ Standard requires that unexpected is called when a function throws an exception that is not on its throw list. The current implementation does not support this.

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Have you compiled with the right flags? Visual Studio has a default of not turning on exception handling for some optimised release builds.

You want /c and /EHsc

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3  
The documentation you linked to says The C++ Standard requires that unexpected is called when a function throws an exception that is not on its throw list. The current implementation does not support this. –  ta.speot.is Jun 19 '12 at 8:51
    
I suspect also that VS c++ didn't implemented that. Could you write this as separate answer ? –  Agnius Vasiliauskas Jun 19 '12 at 9:00

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