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I want to create a javascript class/object that allow me to have various method:

Model class

  • Model.all() » static method
  • Model.find() » static method
  • Model delete() » instance method
  • Model save() » instance method
  • Model.create() » static that returns a new Model instance

For static method I can define them using:

Model.staticMethod(){ method }

while for instance method is better to use:

function Model(){
    this.instanceMethod = function(){}    
}

and then create a new instance

or using prototype?

var m = function Model(){

}

m.prototype.method() = function(){

}

Now let's say that I want to create a new class based on Model, how to inherit not only its prototypes but also its static methods?

EDIT:

to avoid confusion this is more or less what I want to create:

http://activejs.org/activerecord/index.html and http://activejs.org/activerecord/ActiveRecord/Model/index.html

where I can define a new model using something like that

var User = ActiveRecord.create({
    username: '',
    password: '',
    post_count: 0,
    profile: ''
}

then create an instance

var jessica = User.create({
    username: "Jessica",
    password: "rabbit"
});

use instance methods like

jessica.save();

but also class methods:

User.findByUsername('Jessica');
share|improve this question
    
Yes you should use prototype, otherwise you create new function objects for every object you instantiate. – Esailija Jun 19 '12 at 9:05
    
possible duplicate of Use of 'prototype' vs. 'this' in Javascript? – Felix Kling Jun 19 '12 at 9:11
    
Regarding your last question, you probably have to iterate over the methods you added to Model and assign them to the new class as well. – Felix Kling Jun 19 '12 at 9:14
    
so not something referred to the whole class? because to me seems a bit strange to do var a = new Model() and then a.all since a represents a single istance it shouldn't be used to get all the models from the server (all() should do this) – Matteo Pagliazzi Jun 19 '12 at 9:16
2  
There are no real static methods. Everything is an object and everything can have properties. If you assign Model.all = ..., then later you call Model.all(). var a = new Model(); a.all() would not even work. Or maybe you misunderstood my comment and I yours. – Felix Kling Jun 19 '12 at 9:27
up vote 3 down vote accepted

Commented code is pseudo code. You can achieve the same by:

var modelInstanceMethods = {

    save: function() {
        /*
        insert into this.tableName blabla
        */
    },

    'delete': function() {
        /*
        delete from this.tableName blabla
        */
    }
};

var modelStatics = {

    create: function(obj) {
        return new this(obj);
    },

    all: function() {
        /*
        return select * from this.tableName.map( function( values ) {
            return new this(values);
        },this);
        */
    },

    find: function(id) {
        /*
        select * from this.tableName where id = id
        return new this(columnValues);
        */
    }


};

var ActiveRecord = {
    create: function( tableName, fields, methods ) {

        function Model( obj ) {
            this.tableName = tableName;
            this.fields = {};
            if( fields ) {
                for( var field in fields ) {
                    this.fields[field] = fields[field];
                }
            }

            if( obj ) {
                for( var field in obj ) {
                    this.fields[field] = obj[field];
                }       
            }
        }

        Model.tableName = tableName;
        Model.prototype = Object.create(modelInstanceMethods);
        Model.prototype.constructor = Model;

        for( var key in modelStatics ) {
            Model[key] = modelStatics[key];
        }

        if( methods ) {
            for( var key in methods ) {
                Model.prototype[key] = methods[key];
            }   
        }

        return Model;
    }
};

Usage

var User = ActiveRecord.create('users',
    /* fields and their default values */
{
    id: 0,
    username: '',
    password: '',
    post_count: 0,
    profile: ''
}, {
    /*instance methods */
    setPassword: function(password) {
        this.fields.password = password;
    }
});

/*You can define static methods like this */

User.findByUsername = function(username) {
    /*select from this.tableName where userName = username
               return new this(columnValues) blabla
             */
};

var jessica = User.create( {
    username: "Jessica",
    password: "rabbit"
});

jessica.save();

User.findByUsername('Jessica');
share|improve this answer
    
I really like this implementation, I'l study it later. thanks so much! – Matteo Pagliazzi Jun 19 '12 at 11:16
function Model() {}

// Methods in the instantiated object
Model.prototype = {
    constructor: Model,

    // Note that "delete" is a reserved word, so we need quotes
    'delete': function() {},

    save: function() {}
};

// Static methods
Model.all = function() {};

Model.find = function() {};

Model.create = function() {
    return new Model();

    // To be more generic, you can also:
    return new this();
};

When you use var InheritedModel = Object.create( Model );, it also inherits the static methods.

var InheritedModel = Object.create( Model );
!!InheritedModel.all // true

However, you can't do new InheritedModel(), because it's not a function, and using Object.create( InheritedModel ) won't give you the instance methods.

If you want to instantiate the inherited class using new, you need the following:

function InheritedModel() {}

InheritedModel.prototype = Object.create( Model.prototype );

// Copy all the static methods in the InheritedModel object
Object.keys( Model ).forEach( function( key ) {
    InheritedModel[ key ] = Model[ key ];
} );

Edit: after seeing your edit, here is the solution I'd recommend you:

function ActiveRecord( type, args ) {
    if ( type = 'users' ) {
        return new this.users();
    }
}

// Static method on ActiveRecord
ActiveRecord.create = function( type, args ) {
    return new ActiveRecord( type, args );
};

ActiveRecord.prototype = {
    constructor: ActiveRecord,

    // Instance method on ActiveRecord, you won't need it,
    // but your constructor does
    users: function( args ) {}
};

var Users = ActiveRecord.prototype.users;

Users.prototype = {
    constructor: Users,

    // Instance method on User's instance
    save: function() {}
}

// Static method on User
Users.create = function() {}
share|improve this answer
    
how to inherit static methods with this? – Matteo Pagliazzi Jun 19 '12 at 9:13
    
@MatteoPagliazzi by using Object.create – Florian Margaine Jun 19 '12 at 9:23
    
@MatteoPagliazzi Edited to add another solution – Florian Margaine Jun 19 '12 at 9:30
    
this seems exactly what i need! only one question: this way each inherited model will create a new function for model.all it won't use the same like when using prototype right? this may cause big problems with performances or it's negligible? – Matteo Pagliazzi Jun 19 '12 at 9:34
    
@MatteoPagliazzi be careful, I edited the "create InheritedModel" stuff. And it will not create a prototype, it still uses Model methods in the prototype, not creating a new one. – Florian Margaine Jun 19 '12 at 9:39

what about this, you have private and public methods:

function Model() {
    var privateMethods = {
       private1: function() {},
       private2: function() {},
       private3: function() {},
    };

    var publicMethods = {
    method1: function() {},
    method2: function() {
            //call a private method...
            privateMethods.private1();
        }
    };

    return publicMethods;
}


// Static methods
Model.all = function() {};

Model.find = function() {};

Model.create = function() {
    return new Model();
};
share|improve this answer
    
You cannot use inheritance with this – Esailija Jun 19 '12 at 9:10
    
yes, Delegation vs Inheritance – silly Jun 19 '12 at 9:13

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