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How can I use output caching with a .ashx handler? In this case I'm doing some heavy image processing and would like the handler to be cached for a minute or so.

Also, does anyone have any recommendations on how to prevent dogpiling?

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Quite similar thread : stackoverflow.com/questions/745500/…. –  hadi teo Jul 10 '09 at 14:13
    
Another reference : forums.asp.net/t/1294848.aspx –  hadi teo Jul 10 '09 at 14:13

4 Answers 4

up vote 29 down vote accepted

There are some good sources but you want to cache you processing server side and client-side.

Adding HTTP headers should help in the client side caching

here are some Response headers to get started on..

You can spend hours tweaking them until you get the desired performance

//Adds document content type
context.Response.ContentType = currentDocument.MimeType;
context.Response.Cache.SetCacheability(HttpCacheability.Public);
context.Response.Cache.SetExpires(DateTime.Now.AddMinutes(10));
context.Response.Cache.SetMaxAge(new TimeSpan(0,10,0)); 
context.Response.AddHeader("Last-Modified", currentDocument.LastUpdated.ToLongDateString());

// Send back the file content
context.Response.BinaryWrite(currentDocument.Document);

As for server side caching that is a different monster... and there are plenty of caching resources out there...

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1  
Thanks - from reading the comment left above its obvious that output caching can't be used directly in this situation either, so will go with a manual server side solution and this client side one. –  Kieran Benton Jul 10 '09 at 14:53
3  
I did a lot of image serving out of out DB for thumbnails. One thing you need to be careful is setting end user expectations... A user would update a image, then go check the live site... well because the browser was told to cache the image and not even ask for it... they wouldn't see there updates... ( then they would come crying back to dev... and we would say go clear ur browser cache...) –  BigBlondeViking Jul 10 '09 at 15:01
    
Cheers man - I feel your pain, we cache a lot of different things (just not these images as it turns out - which is causing us problems!) and quite regularly you get people complaining about non-immediate changes, even if its only a few minutes timeout! –  Kieran Benton Jul 10 '09 at 15:04
    
Re: MaxAge... codeproject.com/KB/ajax/aspnetajaxtips.aspx Quote: "There's a bug in ASP.NET 2.0 where you cannot change the max-age header." –  frankadelic Jun 8 '10 at 15:58
    
Make sure to include "Response.Cache.SetRevalidation(Web.HttpCacheRevalidation.None);" and "Response.Cache.SetValidUntilExpires(True);" if you want to make sure that they can't request a new image when they refresh the page. Also set "Response.Cache.VaryByParams("*") = True;" if your handlers should maintain different versions by query param. –  Carter Mar 13 '13 at 16:41

you can use like this

public class CacheHandler : IHttpHandler
    {

        public void ProcessRequest(HttpContext context)
        {
            OutputCachedPage page = new OutputCachedPage(new OutputCacheParameters
            {
                Duration = 60,
                Location = OutputCacheLocation.Server,
                VaryByParam = "v"
            });
            page.ProcessRequest(HttpContext.Current);
            context.Response.Write(DateTime.Now);
        }

        public bool IsReusable
        {
            get
            {
                return false;
            }
        }
        private sealed class OutputCachedPage : Page
        {
            private OutputCacheParameters _cacheSettings;

            public OutputCachedPage(OutputCacheParameters cacheSettings)
            {
                // Tracing requires Page IDs to be unique.
                ID = Guid.NewGuid().ToString();
                _cacheSettings = cacheSettings;
            }

            protected override void FrameworkInitialize()
            {
                // when you put the <%@ OutputCache %> directive on a page, the generated code calls InitOutputCache() from here
                base.FrameworkInitialize();
                InitOutputCache(_cacheSettings);
            }
        }
    }
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excellent work man.... great –  patel.milanb Oct 29 '13 at 14:33

I used the following with success and thought it worthwhile to post here .

Manually controlling the ASP.NET page output cache

From http://dotnetperls.com/cache-examples-aspnet

Setting cache options in Handler.ashx files

First, you can use HTTP handlers in ASP.NET for a faster way to server dynamic content than Web Form pages. Handler.ashx is the default name for an ASP.NET generic handler. You need to use the HttpContext parameter and access the Response that way.

Sample code excerpted:

<%@ WebHandler Language="C#" Class="Handler" %>

C# to cache response for 1 hour

using System;
using System.Web;

public class Handler : IHttpHandler {

    public void ProcessRequest (HttpContext context) {
        // Cache this handler response for 1 hour.
        HttpCachePolicy c = context.Response.Cache;
        c.SetCacheability(HttpCacheability.Public);
        c.SetMaxAge(new TimeSpan(1, 0, 0));
    }

    public bool IsReusable {
        get {
            return false;
        }
    }
}
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3  
Correct me if I'm wrong, but don't those options only affect the browser cache. I don't think they have any effect on the IIS or ASP.NET output cache –  RobSiklos Jul 13 '12 at 16:13

Old, question but the answer didn't really mentioned the server-side handling.

As in the winning answer, I would use this for the client side:

context.Response.Cache.SetCacheability(HttpCacheability.Public);
context.Response.Cache.SetExpires(DateTime.Now.AddMinutes(10));
context.Response.Cache.SetMaxAge(TimeSpan.FromMinutes(10)); 

and for the server side, since you are using a ashx instead of a web page, I'm assuming that you are directly writing the output to the Context.Response.

In that case you could use something like this (in this case I want to save the response based on parameter "q", and Im using a sliding window expiration)

public void ProcessRequest(HttpContext context)
{
    string query = context.Request["q"];
    if (context.Cache[query] != null)
    {
        //server side caching using asp.net caching
        context.Response.Write(context.Cache[query]);
        return;
    }

    string response = GetResponse(query);   
    context.Cache.Insert(query, response, null, Cache.NoAbsoluteExpiration, TimeSpan.FromMinutes(10)); 
    context.Response.Write(response);
}
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