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Let's say you need to funnel random, related data given to you into more succinct categories.

Example - You're given the following data. NOTE - There could be any number of other related, columnar data:

 Customer      Product                Category
==========    =========    =================================
Customer A    Product A                 Cat 1
 CustomerA    Product B               Category 1
  Cust-A      Product C    Totally Lame & Unrelated Grouping

Task - Consolidate and normalize the above into clean, pre-defined groupings:

CustomerA
  Category1
    ProductA
    ProductB
    ProductC

Please don't worry about how the finished data will be persisted. But rather focus on how you'll persist and manage the rules for grouping.

Only one assumption: You can't use a database to persist your grouping rules. So when we say "normalize", we're not speaking in terms of relational database normalization rules. But rather we're wanting to remove inconsistencies from data inputs (as seen above) to bring the random data into a consistent state.

So what are the available options? Remain technology agnostic:

XML?

Config files?

Settings file (compiled or not)?

Ini File?

Code?

etc.

List pros & cons for each answer. And though this is indeed an excersize, it's a real-world problem. So assume your client/employer has tasked you with this.

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you should put this a lot clearer ... from the comment of djna: "You'll know what to normalize data to ahead of time and you'll also know what data needs to be normalized ahead of time" ... what does that mean? what do we know? a format? or do we know all values already and simply need to match an input against the correct values? what is the second code block? does that mean we have 1-n relations for Customer & Category, as well as Category and product? and that we need to detect those? –  back2dos Jul 12 '09 at 13:32
    
XML &c. can be viewed as simple datastores. Given many platforms have libraries to handle XML, these (taken together with the storage) constitute a database. What is the purpose behind the requirement that grouping rules not be stored in a database? Is it intended merely to rule out RDBMSs? Is your intent that the rule storage be write-only? Something else? –  outis Feb 15 '10 at 4:20

3 Answers 3

This seems like a data cleansing exercise, perfection is pretty impossible. Issues:

1). Can you specify up front the categories, or must you deduce from the data?

2). What rules can we use to accept equivalence?

"Cat 1" is the same as "Category 1" ? and "Category one" ?

is

"Cat 1." als "Cat 1"? what about "Cat 1?" ? and "Cat 12" ?

Just getting a good set of rules in a challenge.

2). How would you capture those rules? Code or config? If config how would you express it? Do you end up just writing a new specilaised programming language?

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1) & 2) Please see my text on "pre-defined" groupings. You'll know what to normalize data to ahead of time and you'll also know what data needs to be normalized ahead of time. 3) Is actually a part of the original question. Should one use config or not? Pros & Cons? –  Boydski Jul 10 '09 at 15:34

This seems like a data cleansing exercise, perfection is pretty impossible. Issues:

1). Can you specify up front the categories, or must you deduce from the data?

2). What rules can we use to accept equivalence?

"Cat 1" is the same as "Category 1" ? and "Category one" ?

is

"Cat 1." als "Cat 1"? what about "Cat 1?" ? and "Cat 12" ?

Just getting a good set of rules in a challenge.

3). How would you capture those rules? Code or config? If config how would you express it? Do you end up just writing a new specilaised programming language?

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  1. A dictionary mapping for each value. 'Cat1' => 'Category1', 'Category 2' => 'Category2'. This is easy to store, and has no unintended consequences. The disadvantage is that creating all those mappings by hand is actual work.
  2. A series of regular expressions. That way, you're able to capture nearly all rules using relatively little work. The disadvantage is that regular expressions 'misfire' relatively easily, and the order of evaluation matters (i.e. when values match more than one 'rule'.

As for how to persist them? I can't think of a more uninteresting question. You just use whatever's easiest in your preferred programming language.

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