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I'm looking at creating a sweepstake generator and to do this am only using HTML and Javascript. I currently have users picking a 'select' option for the number of 'players' and then an onclick() event which creates that many 'name' boxes.

The code for this is:

<label for="playerNumbers">How many people are involved in the sweepstake?</label>
<select id="playerNumbers" name="playerNumbers">
<option value="2" onclick="makeform(2)"> 2 </option>
<option value="3" onclick="makeform(3)"> 3 </option>
<option value="4" onclick="makeform(4)"> 4 </option>
<option value="5" onclick="makeform(5)"> 5 </option>
<option value="6" onclick="makeform(6)"> 6 </option>
<option value="7" onclick="makeform(7)"> 7 </option>
<option value="8" onclick="makeform(8)"> 8 </option>
<option value="9" onclick="makeform(9)"> 9 </option>
<option value="10" onclick="makeform(10)"> 10 </option>
</select>

with the 'makeform()' function looking like:

function makeform(numberOfPlayers) {
var x = '<form id="playerNames">';
for (i = 0; i < numberOfPlayers; i++) {
    x += '<label for="player'+(i+1)+'">Player '+(i+1)+'</label>';
    x += '<input type="text" id="player'+(i+1)+'" />';
    x += '<br />';
}
document.getElementById("newForm").innerHTML = x;
}

This works a treat but the problem comes when a user fills in the newly generated form. I included a submit bottom at the bottom of the 'overall form' (which includes the new form) but it doesn't seem to recognize the newly generated form.

I suppose I'm asking two questions: 1.) How do I make this work? Can you infinitely generate forms using Javascript or is there a limit? 2.) Is this the best way to do this? I'm sure it's not but don't really know what technology I should be looking at.

Thanks!

(By request - all the code:)

<form id="nameForm">
<div id="teamForm">
<label for="teamNumber">How many teams are involved?</label>
<select id="teamNumber" name="teamNumber">
<option value="2" onclick="makeform1(2)"> 2 </option>
<option value="3" onclick="makeform1(3)"> 3 </option>
<option value="4" onclick="makeform1(4)"> 4 </option>
<option value="5" onclick="makeform1(5)"> 5 </option>
<option value="6" onclick="makeform1(6)"> 6 </option>
<option value="7" onclick="makeform1(7)"> 7 </option>
<option value="8" onclick="makeform1(8)"> 8 </option>
<option value="9" onclick="makeform1(9)"> 9 </option>
<option value="10" onclick="makeform1(10)"> 10 </option>
<option value="11" onclick="makeform1(11)"> 11 </option>
<option value="12" onclick="makeform1(12)"> 12 </option>
<option value="13" onclick="makeform1(13)"> 13 </option>
<option value="14" onclick="makeform1(14)"> 14 </option>
<option value="15" onclick="makeform1(15)"> 15 </option>
<option value="16" onclick="makeform1(16)"> 16 </option>
<option value="17" onclick="makeform1(17)"> 17 </option>
<option value="18" onclick="makeform1(18)"> 18 </option>
<option value="19" onclick="makeform1(19)"> 19 </option>
<option value="20" onclick="makeform1(20)"> 20 </option>
<option value="21" onclick="makeform1(21)"> 21 </option>
<option value="22" onclick="makeform1(22)"> 22 </option>
<option value="23" onclick="makeform1(23)"> 23 </option>
<option value="24" onclick="makeform1(24)"> 24 </option>
<option value="25" onclick="makeform1(25)"> 25 </option>
<option value="26" onclick="makeform1(26)"> 26 </option>
<option value="27" onclick="makeform1(27)"> 27 </option>
<option value="28" onclick="makeform1(28)"> 28 </option>
</select>
<div id="newForm2"></div>
</div>
<label for="playerNumbers">How many people are involved in the sweepstake?</label>
<select id="playerNumbers" name="playerNumbers">
<option value="2" onclick="makeform(2)"> 2 </option>
<option value="3" onclick="makeform(3)"> 3 </option>
<option value="4" onclick="makeform(4)"> 4 </option>
<option value="5" onclick="makeform(5)"> 5 </option>
<option value="6" onclick="makeform(6)"> 6 </option>
<option value="7" onclick="makeform(7)"> 7 </option>
<option value="8" onclick="makeform(8)"> 8 </option>
<option value="9" onclick="makeform(9)"> 9 </option>
<option value="10" onclick="makeform(10)"> 10 </option>
</select>
<div id="newForm"></div>
<input type="submit" value="Submit Form" onclick="doSweepstake(this.form)" />
</form>

and:

function makeform1(numberofTeams) {
var y = '<form id="teamNames">';
for (j = 0; j < numberofTeams; j++) {
    y += '<label for="team'+(j+1)+'">Team '+(j+1)+'</label>';
    y += '<input type="text id="team'+(j+1)+'" />';
    y += '<br />';
}
document.getElementById("newForm2").innerHTML = y;
}

In addition to the function already given above.

share|improve this question
    
is this all your code? Would be great to see how and where you add that submit-button, and why you don't add the </form> tag –  Tobias Jun 19 '12 at 9:35

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

This doesn't work in principle because you can't nest forms. You'll need to add the fields to the parent form.

You could do this with plain JS, but I suggest you don't reinvent the wheel and learn to use a JS library instead -- such as jQuery. This would make your life much easier - it greatly simplifies DOM manipulation (and does much more). For example, you could just do the following:

$("#playerNumbers option").click(function() {
    var p = $("#playerNames");
    for (var i = 0; i < $(this).attr("value"); i++)
        p.append('<label><input /></label><br />'); // etc
})

It might look confusing at first, but a second look through this code shows you a lot of familiar things -- and the elegance of using something like this instead of the unwieldy beasts that are onclick and innerHTML.

share|improve this answer
1  
don't discourage the OP with your sarcasm .. may be he just started out playing with javascript .. –  Avinash Jun 19 '12 at 9:47
    
On the contrary, I'm trying to encourage the OP and point them in the right direction. JavaScript is still JavaScript, even with jQuery - it's just much more convenient. –  egasimus Jun 19 '12 at 9:48
1  
Rest assured I don't feel discouraged :) In fact I'm heading off in the direction of a good jQuery tutorial. –  Kali_89 Jun 19 '12 at 10:06
1  
Good for you :) Once you feel comfortable with jQuery, don't be afraid to have a look at microjs.com - a collection of single-purpose frameworks for those occasions where jQuery is just extra weight :) –  egasimus Jun 19 '12 at 10:07

There are a few things i've spotted:

1) You should be using the onchange event on the select rather than an onclick on the option - this makes it cross browser friendly and accessible - what happens if a user tabs to the select then uses the arrow keys to change the selection? onclick won't fire...

<select id="playerNumbers" name="playerNumbers" onchange="makeform(this.options[this.selectedIndex].value)">
    <option value="2"> 2 </option>
    <option value="3"> 3 </option>
    <option value="4"> 4 </option>
    <option value="5"> 5 </option>
    <option value="6"> 6 </option>
    <option value="7"> 7 </option>
    <option value="8"> 8 </option>
    <option value="9"> 9 </option>
    <option value="10"> 10 </option>
</select>

2) Your form created via JavaScript doesn't have a closing tag or a submit button.

3) Your input elements don't have names, therefore no POST/GET data will be sent.

Try this:

function makeform(numberOfPlayers) {
    var x = '<form id="playerNames">';
    for (i = 0; i < numberOfPlayers; i++) {
        x += '<label for="player'+(i+1)+'">Player '+(i+1)+'</label>';
        x += '<input type="text" id="player'+(i+1)+'" name="player[]" />';
        x += '<br />';
    }
    x += '<input type="submit" name="submit" value="Submit" />';
    x += '</form>';
    document.getElementById("newForm").innerHTML = x;
}
share|improve this answer

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