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I'm trying to find a way how to get only those elements from a given table which PK is listed in a given list of objects.

Don't ask why I'm trying to do so. It's for synchronization of multiple databases where i want to preload all local values for the given primary keys and then insert, updated or delete them.

On the first try I loaded the whole table using dynmaic reflection and return an dictionary with the tables PK as Key and the EntityObject as value which was quite ok. But for larger tables this will get much to heavy. So I need only those for the given PKs.

private static Dictionary<object, EntityObject> GetAllEntities<TEntityType>(ObjectContext dbContext, IEnumerable<object> primaryValues) where TEntityType : EntityObject
    {
        // loop through the elements for the given entity
        return dbContext.CreateObjectSet<TEntityType>().ToDictionary(type => type.EntityKey.EntityKeyValues[0].Value, type => (EntityObject)type); // this runs fine

        // this is what i need to be executed
        return dbContext.CreateObjectSet<TEntityType>().Where(type => primaryValues.Contains(type.EntityKey.EntityKeyValues.First().Value)).ToDictionary(type => type.EntityKey.EntityKeyValues[0].Value, type => (EntityObject)type); // this crashes
    }

The second line throws an error as expected because Linq 2 Entities cannot handle EntityKey directly:

The specified type member 'EntityKey' is not supported in LINQ to Entities. Only initializers, entity members, and entity navigation properties are supported.

I'm sure I found a way already some months before somewhere on the internet but i was unable to find it again. All i remember is, that the guy who originally posted it somewhere called a method in the where-clause which returned the EntityObjects PK value so I could check for existance in the the given list.

Any help, tips, links, whatever would be appreciated.

Maybe it's the wrong question or not the right way to handle these case. So anything could be helpful.

Some additional info: Each table has only one PK which can be of type Guid or string. So it would be a simple string-to-string check for equality.

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If you are using EF 4 why are you using ObjectContext, DbContext is much more appropriate –  Luke McGregor Jun 19 '12 at 10:43
    
I'm using EF4 but the generated model inherits from ObjectContext. And even if this woult help, it's not at me to change this. –  KingKerosin Jun 19 '12 at 10:53

1 Answer 1

It's a bit complicated than this. The issue here is that the linq query is translated to SQL. Entity Framework can only translate to SQL expressions that contain "known" types - i.e. types from the model. EntityKey is not a type like that hence the exception. Still what you are trying to do is possible but requires some Linq Expressions and reflection magic. I came up with a method like this:

    private static IQueryable<TEntity> DynamicContains<TEntity, TProperty>(IQueryable<TEntity> query, Expression<Func<TEntity, TProperty>> property, IEnumerable<TProperty> values)
    {
        var memberExpression = property.Body as MemberExpression; 
        if (memberExpression == null || !(memberExpression.Member is PropertyInfo)) 
        { 
            throw new ArgumentException("Property expression expected", "property"); 
        }

        // get the generic .Contains method
        var containsMethod =
            typeof(Enumerable)
            .GetMethods()
            .Single(m => m.Name == "Contains" && m.GetParameters().Length == 2);

        // convert the generic .Contains method so that is matches the type of the property
        containsMethod = containsMethod.MakeGenericMethod(typeof(TProperty));

        // build e => Enumerable.Contains(values, e.Property)
        var lambda = 
            Expression.Lambda<Func<TEntity, bool>>(
                Expression.Call(
                    containsMethod, Expression.Constant(values), property.Body), 
                    property.Parameters.Single());

        // return query.Where(e => Enumerable.Contains(values, e.Property))
        return query.Where(lambda);
    }

It is a generic Contains on any property (not only keys) that your entity may have. It takes IQueryable so can be applied to any query (not only DbSet/ObjectSet) and returns IQueryable so you can build further on top of it. Don't get intimidated by all the angle brackets. You use this method just like that:

var entities = DynamicContains(ctx.EntitySet, e => e.Id, new[] { 1, 4 });

e => e.Id is a fancy way of telling what property should be used for Contains.

Here is a full example showing this method in wild:

    using System;
    using System.Collections.Generic;
    using System.Data.Entity;
    using System.Linq;
    using System.Linq.Expressions;
    using System.Reflection;
    using System.Text;
    using System.Threading.Tasks;

    namespace ConsoleApplication3
    {
        class MyEntity
        {
            public int Id { get; set; }
            public string Description { get; set; }
        }


        class MyContext : DbContext
        {
            public DbSet<MyEntity> EntitySet { get; set; }
        }

        class Program
        {

            private static void Seed()
            {
                using (var ctx = new MyContext())
                {
                    if (!ctx.EntitySet.Any())
                    {
                        ctx.EntitySet.Add(new MyEntity() { Description = "abc" });
                        ctx.EntitySet.Add(new MyEntity() { Description = "xyz" });
                        ctx.EntitySet.Add(new MyEntity() { Description = null });
                        ctx.EntitySet.Add(new MyEntity() { Description = "123" });
                        ctx.SaveChanges();
                    }
                }
            }

            private static void PrintEntities(IEnumerable<MyEntity> entities)
            {
                foreach (var e in entities)
                {
                    Console.WriteLine("Id: {0}, Description: {1}", e.Id, e.Description);
                }
            }

            static void Main(string[] args)
            {
                List<int> list = new List<int>() { 1, 3 };

                Seed();

                using (var ctx = new MyContext())
                {
                    PrintEntities(DynamicContains(ctx.EntitySet, e => e.Id, new[] { 1, 4 }));
                    PrintEntities(DynamicContains(ctx.EntitySet, e => e.Description, new[] { null, "xyz" }));

                }
            }

            private static IQueryable<TEntity> DynamicContains<TEntity, TProperty>(IQueryable<TEntity> query, Expression<Func<TEntity, TProperty>> property, IEnumerable<TProperty> values)
            {
                var memberExpression = property.Body as MemberExpression; 
                if (memberExpression == null || !(memberExpression.Member is PropertyInfo)) 
                { 
                    throw new ArgumentException("Property expression expected", "property"); 
                }

                // get the generic .Contains method
                var containsMethod =
                    typeof(Enumerable)
                    .GetMethods()
                    .Single(m => m.Name == "Contains" && m.GetParameters().Length == 2);

                // convert the generic .Contains method so that is matches the type of the property
                containsMethod = containsMethod.MakeGenericMethod(typeof(TProperty));

                // build e => Enumerable.Contains(values, e.Property)
                var lambda = 
                    Expression.Lambda<Func<TEntity, bool>>(
                        Expression.Call(
                            containsMethod, Expression.Constant(values), property.Body), 
                            property.Parameters.Single());

                // return query.Where(e => Enumerable.Contains(values, e.Property))
                return query.Where(lambda);
            }
        }
    }
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