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This is pure curiosity. Let's write an object:

 var display = { res1:{ w:640, h:480 }, res2:{ w:320, h:240 }, nores:{} };

Now from this object, we're sending the nores property to a function. Since nores is an object, whatever we change in somefunction is going to be seen later in display.nores:

 somefunction(display.nores);

Now here's the question. Does somefunction() has any form of access to display's other properties (res1 / res2) given that display is defined inside a closure and somefunction() was defined outside of that closure? I mean can it reference the whole display object just from its nores property that was passed as an argument?

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Though I wrote it's not possible in js in my answer, do you know a language where it is possible? maybe C. – gdoron Jun 19 '12 at 10:37
    
I'm not sure either. Maybe there's a v8 crazy magic function somewhere that does it. – GRIGORE-TURBODISEL Jun 19 '12 at 10:39
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There is a good reason what's not possbile, encapsulation. – gdoron Jun 19 '12 at 10:42
    
Well I kinda skimmed through v8's docs, no joy. – GRIGORE-TURBODISEL Jun 19 '12 at 10:46
up vote 4 down vote accepted

Does somefunction() has any form of access to display's other properties (res1 / res2) given that display is defined inside a closure and somefunction() was defined outside of that closure?

No

I mean can it reference the whole display object just from its nores property that was passed as an argument?

There is no reverse relationship between the properties of an object and their values. The only way to find them would be to have access to the object and then to loop over it until you find a match.

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No, you can't get the outer object from the inner object.

You can't "play" with the references addresses in javascript, there is a good reason what's not allowed - encapsulation - you shouldn't be allowed touching things you didn't "recieve".

I don't know if there is a language where this kind of thing is possible, Maybe Maybe C.

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