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I am quite new to R and have a question about loops

In my real dataset there 7000 observations in 80 countries with 15 sectors and 6 types of organizations, but here is a simplified example.

country <- c("a","a","a","a","a","a","b","b","b","b","b","b",
             "c","c","c","c","c","c","d","d","d","d","d","d")
sector <- c("a","a","a","b","c","c","a","b","b","b","c","c",
            "b","b","b","b","c","c","a","a","b","b","c","c")
organization <-c("a","b","c","c","b","a","a","b","b","c","b","b",
                 "c","a","a","b","b","c","c","b","a","a","b","c")
budget <-c(2,4,3,5,9,7,5,4,3,6,1,2,4,5,6,1,5,3,4,2,3,5,4,6)
table <- data.frame(country, sector, organization, budget)

What I want is:

  1. Amount of the different types of organizations in a specific sector in a specific country.
  2. Percentage of the total budget in a sector given to the different kind of organizations.

I first have to make a subset to select only info from country "a" and sector "a"

smalltable <-subset(table, (country == "a") & (sector == "a"))

and then answer my first question, how many of each type of organization are in a sector in a country

smalltable$count <- table(smalltable$organization)

then I need to find the percentage of finance

smalltable$percentage <- smalltable$budget / sum(smalltable$budget)

then i used tapply

 N <- tapply(smalltable$count, smalltable$organization, FUN=sum)
 financialshare <- tapply(smalltable$percentage, smalltable$organization, FUN=sum)    

and finally combined this:

 total <- data.frame (smalltable$country,smalltable$sector,smalltable$organization, N,financialshare)
 total

This is the little table that I require!

But I need this for all my 15 sectors and in all 80 countries, so I need some kind of loop function that runs a loop of all sectors and repeats this loop for every country. I need to make these tables as condensed as possible, bringing together all info about 1 country (so 15 sectors) into one table. Also zero values should be removed from the tables to save space.

How would I need to proceed?

share|improve this question
    
yes, but with all sectors in a specific country in one frame. So for the sample I would like to have 4 country specific dataframes to transfer to excel – user1466195 Jun 19 '12 at 12:38
up vote 3 down vote accepted

I'll give a data.table answer

library(data.table)
my_table=data.table(country, sector, organization, budget)
by_org=my_table[, list(count=.N, budget=sum(budget)),
                  keyby=list(country, sector, organization)]
total_budgets=my_table[, list(total_budget=sum(budget)),
                  keyby=list(country, sector)]
joined_table= total_budgets[by_org]
joined_table[,percentage:=budget/total_budget]

EDIT from Matthew: In v1.8.1, using := by group, the join isn't needed so it's easier and faster and the total_budget column is added to the right which is a more natural place than where it is using the join in v1.8.0 :

DT = data.table(country, sector, organization, budget) 
ans = DT[, list(count=.N, budget=sum(budget)),
           keyby=list(country, sector, organization)] 
ans[, total_budget:=sum(budget), by=list(country,sector)]
ans[, percentage:=budget/total_budget]

Result (using v1.8.1) :

    country sector organization count budget total_budget percentage
 1:       a      a            a     1      2            9  0.2222222
 2:       a      a            b     1      4            9  0.4444444
 3:       a      a            c     1      3            9  0.3333333
 4:       a      b            c     1      5            5  1.0000000
 5:       a      c            a     1      7           16  0.4375000
 6:       a      c            b     1      9           16  0.5625000
 7:       b      a            a     1      5            5  1.0000000
 8:       b      b            b     2      7           13  0.5384615
 9:       b      b            c     1      6           13  0.4615385
10:       b      c            b     2      3            3  1.0000000
11:       c      b            a     2     11           16  0.6875000
12:       c      b            b     1      1           16  0.0625000
13:       c      b            c     1      4           16  0.2500000
14:       c      c            b     1      5            8  0.6250000
15:       c      c            c     1      3            8  0.3750000
16:       d      a            b     1      2            6  0.3333333
17:       d      a            c     1      4            6  0.6666667
18:       d      b            a     2      8            8  1.0000000
19:       d      c            b     1      4           10  0.4000000
20:       d      c            c     1      6           10  0.6000000

Two things to note here: first your question is a bit vague and conflicting as to what you actually want as far as counts and sums go, but hopefully my snippet is self explanatory enough as far as the calculations I'm doing.

Second, it is not idiomatic in R to loop through large numbers of observations as this tends to be slow. Most people who have programmed R for a while tend to use vector operations, plyr, data.table, or other similar packages.

But to be complete, loop construction is as follows:

for (item in list)
{
    ...
}

To iterate over common indexes...

for (i in 1:length(object))
{
    ...
}
share|improve this answer
    
in country A and sector A, there is only one A type organization, but your list displays a count of 3 – user1466195 Jun 19 '12 at 12:25
    
Ah sorry, I think I misunderstood your question then. I see your response to comment of gd07. I'll read it and modify my post accordingly. – Yike Lu Jun 19 '12 at 12:39
    
perfect, thank you – user1466195 Jun 19 '12 at 13:13
library(plyr)
ddply(table,.(country,sector), transform,count=as.vector(table(budget)),percentage=budget / sum(budget))

gives

   country sector organization budget count percentage
1        a      a            a      2     1  0.2222222
2        a      a            b      4     1  0.4444444
3        a      a            c      3     1  0.3333333
4        a      b            c      5     1  1.0000000
5        a      c            b      9     1  0.5625000
6        a      c            a      7     1  0.4375000
7        b      a            a      5     1  1.0000000
8        b      b            b      4     1  0.3076923
9        b      b            b      3     1  0.2307692
10       b      b            c      6     1  0.4615385
11       b      c            b      1     1  0.3333333
12       b      c            b      2     1  0.6666667
13       c      b            c      4     1  0.2500000
14       c      b            a      5     1  0.3125000
15       c      b            a      6     1  0.3750000
16       c      b            b      1     1  0.0625000
17       c      c            b      5     1  0.6250000
18       c      c            c      3     1  0.3750000
19       d      a            c      4     1  0.6666667
20       d      a            b      2     1  0.3333333
21       d      b            a      3     1  0.3750000
22       d      b            a      5     1  0.6250000
23       d      c            b      4     1  0.4000000
24       d      c            c      6     1  0.6000000
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you already for this, but the percentage should not be per entry, but per organization type. So in lines 11-12 and 21-22 organization type 'a' is displayed twice for the same country and sector and this should not be the case. They have to be summed to form one group. Then there budgets are summed too and the percentage compares organizations type 'a' with 'b' and 'c' types. This would also make it possible to perform a count that will be higher than one. – user1466195 Jun 19 '12 at 12:15

You've set this up perfectly for using plyr. By that, I mean that you have a process that (almost) works on one subset that returns exactly what you want for that subset, and now you need to just loop over all possible subsets. I re-wrote your code to make it tighter and work around possible missing organizations.

library("plyr")

ddply(table, .(country, sector), function(smalltable) {
  smalltable <- ddply(smalltable, .(organization), summarise, 
                      count=length(budget), budget=sum(budget))
  smalltable$percentage <- smalltable$budget / sum(smalltable$budget)
  smalltable
})

which gives

   country sector organization count budget percentage
1        a      a            a     1      2  0.2222222
2        a      a            b     1      4  0.4444444
3        a      a            c     1      3  0.3333333
4        a      b            c     1      5  1.0000000
5        a      c            a     1      7  0.4375000
6        a      c            b     1      9  0.5625000
7        b      a            a     1      5  1.0000000
8        b      b            b     2      7  0.5384615
9        b      b            c     1      6  0.4615385
10       b      c            b     2      3  1.0000000
11       c      b            a     2     11  0.6875000
12       c      b            b     1      1  0.0625000
13       c      b            c     1      4  0.2500000
14       c      c            b     1      5  0.6250000
15       c      c            c     1      3  0.3750000
16       d      a            b     1      2  0.3333333
17       d      a            c     1      4  0.6666667
18       d      b            a     2      8  1.0000000
19       d      c            b     1      4  0.4000000
20       d      c            c     1      6  0.6000000

Note that table is not a good name for a variable since it is also the name of a base function.

share|improve this answer
    
The nested ddply within another ddply might get quite slow as data size increases, iiuc. – Matt Dowle Jun 21 '12 at 8:56
    
@MatthewDowle It could, but with 7000 records, an outer grouping of 1200 and an inner grouping of 6, it should be reasonable. If it is not, then the data.table approach is better. – Brian Diggs Jun 21 '12 at 14:59

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