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Here the scenario :

A method is called each minute by a timer. This method could be call through UI (a button). I want that if my method is "in process", and is called, it does not execute the method twice.

In my method I use a simple boolean :

    private bool _isProcessing;
    public void JustDoIt(Action a, int interval, int times)
    {
        if (!_isProcessing)
        {
            _isProcessing = true;
            for (int i = 0; i < times; i++)
            {
                a();
                Thread.Sleep(interval);
            }
        }
        _isProcessing = false;
    }

It works fine. I test this functionality with this test :

    [Test]
    public void Should_Output_A_String_Only_3_Times()
    {
        var consoleMock = new Mock<IConsole>();
        IConsole console = consoleMock.Object;
        var doer = new Doer { Console = console };

        Action a = new Action(() => console.Writeline("TASK DONE !"));

        // Simulate a call by Timer
        var taskA = Task.Factory.StartNew(() => doer.JustDoIt(a, 1000, 3));

        // Simulate a call by UI
        var taskB = Task.Factory.StartNew(() => doer.JustDoIt(a));

        taskA.Wait();
        consoleMock.Verify(c => c.Writeline("TASK DONE !"), Times.Exactly(3));
    }

A developer reviews my code and says : "I replaced your boolean by a lock keyword. It's more Thread Safe. Frankly I'm not masterize multithreading so I answered him "OK Guy !"

few days later (today to be more precise), I want to test what if the difference between using lock or a simple boolean. So I was surprised to constate when I replace a boolean by the lock keyword like this :

    private object _locker = new Object();
    public void JustDoIt(Action a, int interval, int times)
    {
        lock (_locker)
        {
            //_isProcessing = true;
            for (int i = 0; i < times; i++)
            {
                a();
                Thread.Sleep(interval);
            }
        }
        //_isProcessing = false;
    }

The precedent test don't pass :

Message : Moq.MockException : Expected invocation on the mock exactly 3 times, but was 4 times: c=>c.Writeline("TASK DONE !")

So, do I use the lock keyword badly ? Should it be 'Static' ?

Thank you

share|improve this question
1  
Both of these implementations are broken. –  David Schwartz Jun 19 '12 at 11:27
    
Could you explain me please ? –  Florian Jun 19 '12 at 11:30
    
Yours is broken because it contains no synchronization. His is broken because it holds the lock the whole time, stalling any thread that calls the function. –  David Schwartz Jun 19 '12 at 11:34
    
also the Guy is a moron. if you want to sync one particular section of code and not an object which is used in many places you use bool not lock. also he is double moron because you dont use things because they look more multithready.. you use them for a reason. if he cant explain it dont listen to him –  Boppity Bop Jun 21 '12 at 1:59

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Make _isProcessing volatile. And then do this:

public void JustDoIt(Action a, int interval, int times)
{
    if (_isProcessing) return
    _isProcessing = true;
    for (int i = 0; i < times; i++)
    {
        a();
        Thread.Sleep(interval);
    }
    _isProcessing = false;
}

This has a minor race condition, but since your code isn't synchronized to anything anyway, I don't believe it can possibly matter.

share|improve this answer
    
Why make _isProcessing volatile ? volatile is to allow another thread to access to the field. No ? –  Florian Jun 19 '12 at 12:21
1  
with volatile you define, that the threads have always to read the value in the main memory and not in the thread own cache. –  lee.O Jun 19 '12 at 12:24
    
Thank you David and Lee for your enlightments ! –  Florian Jun 19 '12 at 12:28
3  
@Florian: The C# memory model does not guarantee that one thread will ever observe a change to a variable made by another thread unless you meet certain requirements. One way to meet those requirements is to make the variable volatile. For example, the compiler is free to optimize the code by removing _isProcessing = true; since it just gets set back to false and no code could possibly tell the difference (unless it breaks the rules). (Note that this use of volatile would be totally broken in C++!) –  David Schwartz Jun 19 '12 at 13:37
1  
@David: If the GUI call happens at the same time as the timer there is a chance that both threads see _isprocessing as false. That is prevented with interlock. –  adrianm Jun 19 '12 at 19:19

You just lock it, that means others thread which would like to enter the critical section wait for the lock and they will enter the lock if the current thread/task releases it.

Eg.: TaskA aquires the lock, it is now in the Critical Section and executes the method a() 3 times. When TaskA has finished the executions, it releases the lock and maybe there is context switch, so TaskB runs the method a() (the 4th time). After TaskB returns the main-threads says.. "hey, TaskA has finished, so i verify my results"

Addiontional to that, i don't know if TaskA has to run before TaskB. So, i don't know if the Task-Scheduler is FIFO.

share|improve this answer
    
Ok, so maybe it's my test which is functionally wrong... and not simulate exactly a call from UI during a call from timer... –  Florian Jun 19 '12 at 11:45
    
i would use david schwartz solution. With his solution you will get (the most of the time) your desired result. :) –  lee.O Jun 19 '12 at 11:52

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