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I am using databases that aren't Oracle or Postgresql, which means I don't have access to deferred constraints, which means that constraints must be valid at all times (instead of just on commit).

Let's say I'm storing a linked list type structure in a database like so:

id     parentId
---------------
1      null
2      1
3      2
4      3
5      4
6      5

parentId is a foreign key reference to id, and is required to be unique via a constraint.

Let's say I wanted to move item 5 to sit just before item 1, so our DB would look like this:

id     parentId
---------------
1      null
2      5 <-- different
3      2
4      3
5      1 <-- different
6      4 <-- different

Three rows need to be altered, which is three update statements. Any one of these update statements will cause a constraint violation: all three statements must be complete before the constraint would be valid again.

My question is: what is the best way of not violating the uniqueness constraint?

I can currently conceive of two different solutions, neither of which I like:

  • Set each affected parentId to null and then perform the three updates
  • Completely change my data model so it's more of a 'copy on write' style versioned database, where these sorts of issues are not a problem.
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Hmm, interesting. I can't think of anything (DBMS-agnostic at least) that's better than changing stuff to null, but there's got to be another way. –  userBigNum Jun 19 '12 at 11:33
1  
"Three rows need to be altered, which is three update statements". Or it could be one UPDATE statement affecting three rows. That would work in SQL Server. What DBMSs are you actually using? –  Martin Smith Jun 19 '12 at 11:35
    
@MartinSmith, you mean with CASE statements? ( karlrixon.co.uk/writing/…) I did not know you could do that... And the DB is currently SQLite, but will probably move onto MySQL at some point. –  SCdF Jun 19 '12 at 11:41
    
@SCdF - Either with CASE statements or by using a table expression that contains multiple values. (e.g. VALUES clause or table valued parameter). That all applies to SQL Server though. Not sure what the SQLite behaviour is / options are. –  Martin Smith Jun 19 '12 at 11:44
    
Depends on what else you are doing and how many, but remove them from the table (into a temp table?) square them up and then put them back, maybe? –  Tony Hopkinson Jun 19 '12 at 11:48
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1 Answer

You can do this in a single query. I'm sure there are many variations of this, but here is what I would use...

DECLARE
  @node_id         INT,
  @new_parent_id   INT
SELECT
  @node_id         = 5,
  @new_parent      = 1

UPDATE
  yourTable
SET
  parent_id = CASE WHEN yourTable.id = target_node.id    THEN new_antiscendant.id
                   WHEN yourTable.id = descendant.id     THEN target_node.parent_id
                   WHEN yourTable.id = new_descendant.id THEN target_node.id
              END
FROM
  yourTable          AS target_node
LEFT JOIN
  yourTable          AS descendant
    ON descendant.parent_id = target_node.id
LEFT JOIN
  yourTable          AS new_antiscendant
    ON new_antiscendant.id = @new_parent_id
LEFT JOIN
  yourTable          AS new_descendant
    ON COALESCE(new_descendant.parent_id, -1) = COALESCE(new_antiscendant.id, -1)
INNER JOIN
  yourTable
    ON yourTable.id IN (target_node.id, descendant.id, new_descendant.id)
WHERE
  target_node.id = @node_id

This will work even if the @new_parent_id is NULL or the last record in the list.

MySQL doesn't like self joins in updates, so the approach would probably be to do the LEFT JOINs into a temporary table to get the new mapping. Then join on that table to update all three recors in a single query.

INSERT INTO
  yourTempTable
SELECT
  yourTable.id    AS node_id,
  CASE WHEN yourTable.id = target_node.id    THEN new_antiscendant.id
       WHEN yourTable.id = descendant.id     THEN target_node.parent_id
       WHEN yourTable.id = new_descendant.id THEN target_node.id
  END             AS new_parent_id
FROM
  yourTable          AS target_node
LEFT JOIN
  yourTable          AS descendant
    ON descendant.parent_id = target_node.id
LEFT JOIN
  yourTable          AS new_antiscendant
    ON new_antiscendant.id = @new_parent_id
LEFT JOIN
  yourTable          AS new_descendant
    ON COALESCE(new_descendant.parent_id, -1) = COALESCE(new_antiscendant.id, -1)
INNER JOIN
  yourTable
    ON yourTable.id IN (target_node.id, descendant.id, new_descendant.id)
WHERE
  target_node.id = @node_id

UPDATE
  yourTable
SET
  parent_id = yourTempTable.newParentID
FROM
  yourTable
INNER JOIN
  yourTempTable
    ON yourTempTamp.node_id = yourTable.id

(The exact syntax depends on your RDBMS.)

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