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Is it worth to write this piece of code:

RelayCommand _saveCommand;
public ICommand SaveCommand
{
    get
    {
        if (_saveCommand == null)
        {
            _saveCommand = new RelayCommand(this.Save);
        }
        return _saveCommand;
    }
}

instead of just returning new object every time:

public ICommand SaveCommand
{
    get { return new RelayCommand(this.Save); }
}

From what I know command getters are used pretty rarely and RelayCommand's constructor is pretty quick. Is it better to write longer code?

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2  
What is it you are concerned with? Code-length, memory-usage,..? If it's length, you can shorten your first example down to one line: return _saveCommand ?? (_saveCommand = new RelayCommand(this.Save)); –  Brunner Jun 19 '12 at 11:41
    
Why don't you do readonly RelayCommand _saveCommand=new RelayCommand(Save); public ICommand SaveCommand {get { return _saveCommand; }} ? –  Steve B Jun 19 '12 at 11:44
    
Or you can also add _saveCommand=new RelayCommand(Save); in the ctor of your class –  Steve B Jun 19 '12 at 11:47
1  
well, you need to keep a reference to a command object, right? If you return a new RelayCommand everytime, and you're not keeping a reference to the command object -- then, how are you supposed to manage the CanExecute of those returned commands? –  Eren Ersönmez Jun 19 '12 at 11:50
    
@ErenErsönmez CanExecute delegate can also be passed to a constructor and CanExecuteChanged is managed using System.Windows.Input.CommandManager (see link to RelayCommand's source). –  Poma Jun 19 '12 at 12:09
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3 Answers 3

up vote 10 down vote accepted

I like the null coalescing operator

public ICommand SaveCommand 
{ 
    get { return _saveCommand ?? (_saveCommand = new RelayCommand(this.Save); }
}

It returns the left-hand operand if the operand is not null, otherwise it returns the right operand.

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While I like ?? too, I feel like it's not an answer to the question that was asked. Which I think boils down to "return new object every time or reuse old one". –  Brunner Jun 20 '12 at 7:35
    
@Brunner: Yeah, I agree. But the question also contained "Is it better to write long code" and ?? makes it alot shorter. Anyway, I was about to edit the question to include more info but then the other answers were already posted. –  Fredrik Hedblad Jun 20 '12 at 7:41
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This design might be missleading for the users of your class. For example they can read the value of the property in a loop with thousands of iterations. That will create many new objects and the user probably won't expect that.

See the documentation of StyleCop warning CA1819: Properties should not return arrays - this is a very similar issue.

Typically, users will not understand the adverse performance implications of calling such a property. Specifically, they might use the property as an indexed property.

Additionally, SaveCommand == SaveCommand will be false. I think this is counterintuitive.

To sum up, this might not be the best design, however, if the users of your code know how it works and how to use it properly, then it's ok.

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Yes, it's bad to return a new object every time. Why do it? If, for any reason, that getter is called many times, you'll be creating new objects in memory every time. If you do that for just this one, isolated instance, that's not so terrible. But if you make a habit of programming this way, you'll create hard-to-find issues and have a code base that's difficult to maintain. It's better to be simple, clean and elegant at all times, and end up with a nice, clean, easy-to-maintain code base.

By the way, you could always just initialize the field when you declare it:

RelayCommand _saveCommand = new RelayCommand(this.Save);

Then your getter only needs this in it:

return _saveCommand;
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