Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I am trying to read a file line by line starting from a specific line in bash. I have already used the while command to read each line of the file by incrementing the count .cant I make it to start from a specific line ?

let count=0
declare -a ARRAY

while read LINE; do
ARRAY[$count]=$LINE 
vech=${ARRAY[$count]}
    if [...blah ..]
     then
    ...blah..
    fi 
sleep 2 
((count++)) 
done < filec.c 

Any kind of help in the form of suggestions or algorithms are welcome. Thanks in advance for the replies

Edit : I am trying to pass the line number as a variable . I am Grepping for a specific pattern and if found , should pass the line number starting from the pattern.

share|improve this question
1  
Why in your code snippet there is nothing that increments the counter? Please, show the real code, and then the answer will be almost obvious. – Arsen7 Jun 19 '12 at 13:51
    
Are there spaces in $LINE ? – Tim Pote Jun 19 '12 at 14:39
    
@Arsen7< I have shown the real code :) – Jith Jun 19 '12 at 14:56
    
@TimPote The syntax is just fine , it works for reading lines from the start of the file :) – Jith Jun 19 '12 at 14:57
    
@Geekasaur I'm not asking to find out whether or not it works. I'm asking because if there are no spaces you can use sed. – Tim Pote Jun 19 '12 at 15:00
up vote 8 down vote accepted

I would use sed's addresses to start at a particular line number and print to the end of the file:

lineNumber=10
sed -n "$lineNumber"',$p' |
while read line; do
  # do stuff
done

Either that or, as Fredrik suggested, use awk:

lineNumber=10
awk "NR > $lineNumber" |
while read line; do
  # do stuff
done
share|improve this answer

Some of the many ways: http://mywiki.wooledge.org/BashFAQ/011

Personally:

printf '%s\n' {1..6} | { mapfile -ts 3 x; declare -p x; }                  

Also, don't use all-caps variable names.

share|improve this answer

What about something like this?

while read -r line
do
    echo "$line"
done < <(tail -n +number file.name)

It's not POSIX compatible, but try on your Bash. Of course, do what you want with $line inside while loop.
PS: Change number with yhe number line you want and file.name with the file name.

share|improve this answer

Just keep a counter. To print all lines after a certain line, you can do like this:

#!/bin/bash

cnt=0
while read LINE
do
    if [ "$cnt" -gt 5 ];
    then
        echo $LINE
    fi
    cnt=$((cnt+1))
done < lines.txt

or, why not use awk:

awk 'NR>5' lines.txt 
share|improve this answer

Just go a read a certain number of lines up to the number you want and start your logic to read the rest.

There is no way to economize on a "text" file, you can't skip lines without actually reading them. The lines are delimited by 0x0a and of variable lengths. Therefore each delimiter must be scanned and counted to reach a certain "line-number". There are gimmicks that let you think you didn't read them, but you did.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.