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I have a file which looks like this:

80,1p21  
81,19q13  
82,6p12.3  
83,Xp11.22  
84,3pter-q21  
86,3q26.33  
87,14q24.1-q24.2|14q24|14q22-q24  
88,1q42-q43  
89,11q13.1  
90,2q23-q24  
91,12q13  
92,2q22.3  
93,3p22  
94,12q11-q14  
95,3p21.1  
97,14q24.3  
98,2p16.2  

And I want to sort them based on second column. And the first column should change accordingly too. When you use sort command in perl, it doesn't do it because it says its not numeric. Is there a way to sort things alpha numerically in perl?

Thanks.

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7  
Yes, you can sort with a custom comparison function in Perl. Have you tried the documentation? –  lanzz Jun 19 '12 at 13:56
1  
Also, if you have them in a file already, you might try the unix sort command. A perl script to sort a file is overkill. –  Mark Tozzi Jun 19 '12 at 14:08
3  
Why does RTFM get four upvotes. If you don't want to answer beginner's questions, then just don't answer them. There's nothing wrong with pointing out the docs, but provide some value with the link, like Dave Cross did below. –  Len Jaffe Jun 19 '12 at 15:36
    
This question was asked here a LOT of times. And it's quite well covered by documentation. Now let me ask you: aren't you saying that ignoring search is the right thing to do for beginners? In my opinion, it's quite the opposite actually: it's even more important for beginner to start using search ASAP. –  raina77ow Jun 19 '12 at 16:30
1  
@Ianzz: So you're the SO police enforcing an "Ask non trivial questions or RTFM" policy? Use SO to teach more than "Go get lost in the 5000 pages of perl docs." Teach, "Here's how to find that in the 5000 pages of docs", "Here's other relevant things to consider while choosing the right answer for your question". Teach fishing skills, don't just tell them to go fish. –  Len Jaffe Jun 21 '12 at 16:46

3 Answers 3

If you read the documentation for sort, you'll see that you don't need to do a numeric sort in Perl. You can do string comparisons too.

@sorted = sort { $a cmp $b } @unsorted;

But that still leaves you with a problem as, for example, 19q will sort before 6p. So you can write your own sort function which can make whatever transformations you want before doing the comparison.

@sorted = sort my_complex_sort @unsorted;

sub my_complex_sort {
  # code that compares $a and $b and returns -1, 0 or 1 as appropriate
  # It's probably best in most cases to do the actual comparison using cmp or <=>

  # Extract the digits following the first comma
  my ($number_a) = $a =~ /,(\d+)/;
  my ($number_b) = $b =~ /,(\d+)/;

  # Extract the letter following those digits
  my ($letter_a) = $a =~ /,\d+(a-z)/;
  my ($letter_b) = $b =~ /,\d+(a-z)/;

  # Compare and return
  return $number_a <=> $number_b or $letter_a cmp $letter_b;
}
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10  
Sort::Naturally –  Zaid Jun 19 '12 at 14:57
#!/usr/bin/env perl

use strict;
use warnings;

my @datas   = map { /^(\d+),(\d*)(.*)$/; [$1, $2, $3]; } <DATA>;
my @res     = sort {$a->[1] <=> $b->[1] or $a->[2] cmp $b->[2]} @datas;
foreach my $data (@res) {
    my ($x, $y, $z) = @{$data};
    print "$x,$y$z\n";
}

__DATA__
80,1p21
81,19q13
82,6p12.3
83,Xp11.22
84,3pter-q21
86,3q26.33
87,14q24.1-q24.2|14q24|14q22-q24
88,1q42-q43
89,11q13.1
90,2q23-q24
91,12q13
92,2q22.3
93,3p22
94,12q11-q14
95,3p21.1
97,14q24.3
98,2p16.2 
share|improve this answer
    
You may want to explain your answer beyond just code. –  SomeKittens Jun 19 '12 at 15:51
    
This will, for example, sort 19q13 before 6p12.3. I don't think that's what the OP wanted. –  Dave Cross Jun 19 '12 at 16:27

I actually found the answer to this. The code looks a bit complicated though.

#!/usr/bin/env perl

use strict;  
use warnings;

sub main {   
my $file;  
if (@ARGV != 1) {   
    die "Usage: perl hashofhash_sort.pl <filename>\n";
}   
else {  
    $file = $ARGV[0];   
}  

open(IN, $file) or die "Error!! Cannot open the $file file: $!\n";
my @file = <IN>;
chomp @file;
my ($entrez_gene, $loci, $chr, $band, $pq, $band_num);
my (%chromosome, %loci_entrez);

foreach my $line (@file) {
    if ($line =~ /(\d+),(.+)/) {
        # Entrez genes
        $entrez_gene = $1;

        # Locus like 12p23.4
        $loci = $2;

        if ($loci =~ /^(\d+)(.+)?/) {
            # chromosome number alone (only numericals)
            $chr = $1;
            if ($2) {
                # locus minus chromosome number. If 12p23.4, then $band is p23.4
                $band = "$2";
                if ($band =~ /^([pq])(.+)/) {
                    # either p or q
                    $pq = $1;
                    # stores the numericals. for p23.4, stores 23.4
                    $band_num = $2;
                }

                if (exists $chromosome{$chr}) {
                    if (exists $chromosome{$chr}{$pq}) {
                        push (@{$chromosome{$chr}{$pq}}, $band_num);
                    }
                    else {
                        $chromosome{$chr}{$pq} = [$band_num];
                    }
                }

                else {
                    $chromosome{$chr}{$pq} = [$band_num];
                }
            }
        }
    }
} # End of foreach loop

foreach my $key (sort {$a <=> $b} keys %chromosome) {
    my %seen = ();
    foreach my $key2 (sort {$a cmp $b } keys %{$chromosome{$key}}) {
        my @unique = grep { ! $seen{$_}++ } @{$chromosome{$key}{$key2}};
        my @sorted = sort @unique;
        foreach my $element (@sorted) {
            my $sorted_locus = "$key$key2$element";
            if (exists $loci_entrez{$sorted_locus}) {
                foreach my $element2 (@{$loci_entrez{$sorted_locus}}) {
                        print "$element2,$sorted_locus\n";

                }
            }
        }
    }

}


} # End of main

main();
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