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SAMPLE DATA

table 1

table.DateTime_From          |         table.DateTime_To
-----------------------------|--------------------------------
01/05/2001 00:00:00          |         01/05/2001 08:00:00
01/05/2001 08:00:00          |         01/05/2001 18:00:00
01/05/2001 18:00:00          |         01/05/2001 00:00:00
03/05/2001 00:00:00          |         03/05/2001 12:00:00
03/05/2001 12:00:00          |         03/05/2001 15:00:00
03/05/2001 15:00:00          |         03/05/2001 00:00:00
07/05/2001 00:00:00          |         07/05/2001 00:00:00
06/05/2001 00:00:00          |         06/05/2001 00:00:00
05/06/2001 00:00:00          |         05/06/2001 00:00:00
07/06/2001 00:00:00          |         07/06/2001 11:00:00
07/06/2001 11:00:00          |         07/06/2001 14:00:00
07/06/2001 14:00:00          |         07/06/2001 00:00:00

The table above has properties such as:

  1. For each record table.DateTime_From <= table.DateTime_To.
  2. A time value 24:00:00 is sadly sometimes represented as 00:00:00 e.g. compare table 2 and table 3 - this cannot be changed, hence changing this is not even an option.
  3. A single record can sometimes have a time value 00:00:00 under both the table.DateTime_From and table.DateTime_To e.g. as see table 4.

table 2

table.DateTime_From          |         table.DateTime_To
-----------------------------|--------------------------------
01/05/2001 18:00:00          |         01/05/2001 00:00:00

table 3

table.DateTime_From          |         table.DateTime_To
-----------------------------|--------------------------------
01/05/2001 18:00:00          |         01/05/2001 24:00:00

table 4

table.DateTime_From          |         table.DateTime_To
-----------------------------|--------------------------------
07/05/2001 00:00:00          |         07/05/2001 00:00:00

OBSERVATION

  1. Using MIN (table.DateTime_From) gives 01/05/2001 00:00:00

  2. Attempting to use MAX (table.DateTime_To) creates a problem because this would give 07/06/2001 14:00:00 - although this should actually have been 07/06/2001 00:00:00 i.e. 07/06/2001 24:00:00.

  3. Remember that 07/06/2001 24:00:00 is represented as 07/06/2001 00:00:00 - hence the problem when using MAX (table.DateTime_From).

QUESTION

  1. Is there a way around the problem observed with using MAX (table.DateTime_From), so that I would then be able to get 07/06/2001 00:00:00 - even though its a very poor representation of 07/06/2001 24:00:00.

  2. Or is there some fundamental detail that I am not understanding here ...

share|improve this question
1  
Are you storing the timestamps as strings? You cannot compare these dates meaningfully, because 31/01/2001 would be "greater" than 01/12/2001. – lanzz Jun 19 '12 at 15:08
    
the timestamps are not strings. the time-stamps are present in a field defined specifically as a date-time value on an SQL Server table. – Sysuser Jun 19 '12 at 15:20
    
moreover that table is being used by a Service Management System (SMS) hence altering the table is not even an option - assuming that comes up. The SMS is quite fickle hence I usually tend to "ONLY" read data from it ... and then try to use SQL to juggle the selected data. – Sysuser Jun 19 '12 at 15:23
    
24:00:00 isn't a valid DateTime. SQL Server datetime time portion goes from 00:00:00 through 23:59:59.997. – N West Jun 19 '12 at 15:25
    
the timestamp 24:00:00 was included in the explanation to only help people understand what 00:00:00 is supposed to mean in another context within the tables. – Sysuser Jun 19 '12 at 15:54

Why don't you create a view that does something like this (in SQL Server dialect)

SELECT table.DateTime_From
 , table.DateTime_To
 , CASE 
    WHEN DATEPART(table.DateTime_From, hour) = 0 
        AND DATEPART(table.DateTime_From, minute) = 0
        AND DATEPART(table.DateTime_From, second) = 0 
      THEN DATEADD(day, 1, table.DateTime_From)
    ELSE table.DateTime_From
   END AS DateTime_From_Corrected
 , CASE 
    WHEN DATEPART(table.DateTime_To, hour) = 0 
        AND DATEPART(table.DateTime_To, minute) = 0
        AND DATEPART(table.DateTime_To, second) = 0 
      THEN DATEADD(day, 1, table.DateTime_To)
    ELSE table.DateTime_To
   END AS DateTime_To_Corrected
FROM MyData table

and then you can use the Corrected columns in your query?

share|improve this answer
    
would have a look at your code – Sysuser Jun 19 '12 at 15:13
    
logic of your code seems similar to what @X-Zero suggested. The only problem is that sometimes 00:00:00 really means 00:00:00. Yet at other times 00:00:00 means 24:00:00 - hence why am threading carefully with the idea. – Sysuser Jun 20 '12 at 8:41
    
Ok, but how do you tell which time it really means? – dsolimano Jun 20 '12 at 12:45

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