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In our UI project we are using a set of custom controls. The custom controls were written some years back. All controls override the OnPaint mathod as given below. Is it correct to call OnPaintBackground in OnPaint Method?

protected override void OnPaint(PaintEventArgs e)
    {
        base.OnPaintBackground(e);
        base.OnPaint(e);
    }
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do you have a requirement to paint something before/after [although after is a rare case] the client of your control paints something with its Paint event ? –  Angshuman Agarwal Jun 19 '12 at 15:30
    
no there are no such requirement –  Maanu Jun 19 '12 at 15:33
    
Quote from MSDN: Inheriting classes should override this method to handle the erase background request from windows. When overriding OnPaintBackground in a derived class it is not necessary to call the base class's OnPaintBackground. If you are simply calling like this in OnPaint, then probably you can get rid of it. Does not make any sense to me at least. –  Angshuman Agarwal Jun 19 '12 at 15:37
    
Will this result in flickering of the control? –  Maanu Jun 19 '12 at 15:46
    
If you are you doing any back color painting later in the code, then you may override OnPaintBackground & do that stuff here to avoid flicker. But calling & delegating OnPaintBackground to the base from OnPaint does not make any sense. See this simple sample here to get an idea and understanding of OnPaintBackground - bobpowell.net/transcontrols.htm –  Angshuman Agarwal Jun 19 '12 at 16:07

1 Answer 1

Excerpt from https://sites.google.com/site/craigandera/craigs-stuff/windows-forms/flicker-free-control-drawing EVERY time your control paints, there are 2 events fired. OnPaintBackground and then OnPaint. They always fire one after another. So as a user types, they will fire like this: OnPaintBackground, OnPaint, OnPaintBackground, OnPaint, etc.

This might help you understand the underlying thought process, but it still does justify calling OnPaintBackground method.

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