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Just wanted to ask you about the drawbacks (I mean memory or reponse time) of using an object with more than 300 properties in the .NET Framewok (C#).

I'm thinking to separate the properties in different classes, but my problem here is that the properties don't have a big relation between them.

I'm not going to do any complexe calculation, I will just fill the properties of the instatiaded object and send him to another program, which is going to send him back.

What do you think

EDIT

I will have just one object while running my program.

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I think you take the good decision. –  Aelios Jun 19 '12 at 15:45
6  
Are you actually talking about attributes, or are you in fact talking about properties? –  Fredrik Mörk Jun 19 '12 at 15:45
    
Let's say properties in another term ;) –  Christophe Jun 19 '12 at 15:47
3  
We are programmers. A .NET Attribute is very different to a .NET Property. We like to be exact. –  Oded Jun 19 '12 at 15:49
    
@Oded Ok thanks, I changed the title and the body now ;) –  Christophe Jun 19 '12 at 15:52

3 Answers 3

up vote 10 down vote accepted

Biggest drawback: readability.

A class with 300 attributes (I assume you mean properties, as .NET attributes have a specific technical meaning) is too large to read and understand. If, as you say, the attributes don't have a big relation between them, you should look for how they should be decomposed into smaller classes of related items.

Your description:

I'm not going to do any complexe calculation, I will just fill the attributes of the instatiaded object and send him to another program, which is going to send him back.

This seems to indicate a DTO (Data Transfer Object) that needs to go between systems - I would think that again, you should think about decomposing the object into several (so if related items change, you don't have to change the whole interface).

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One word: Abstraction

If you have one huge class of 300 properties, you have only one big clunk abstraction in your whole project.

You might be the only person using it, but possibly years later when you have to go back and alter something you will probably be perplexed with that you have done.

This class below is fine, but it can leave some functionality out.

public class Person
{
    public string FirstName { get; set; }
    public string LastName { get; set; }
    public string FullName { get; set; }
    public char Gender { get; set; }
    public string Social { get; private set; }
}

All of those properties can be used in a functional program, but you can provide yourself with so much more functionality.

The below example is refactored to abstract out Social to it's own class SSN:

public class Person
{
    public string FirstName { get; set; }
    public string LastName { get; set; }
    public string FullName { get; set; }
    public char Gender { get; set; }
    public SSN Social { get; private set; }
}

public class SSN
{
    public const int SSN_LENGTH = 9;

    public string FirstThree { get; set; }
    public string MiddleTwo { get; set; }
    public string LastFour { get; set; }

    public SSN(string ssn)
    {
        FirstThree = ssn.Substring(0, 3); 
        MiddleTwo = ssn.Substring(2, 2);
        LastFour = ssn.Substring(5, 4);
    }

    public string ToString(bool format = false)
    {
        string formatDelimiter = "";
        if (format)
        {
            formatDelimiter = "-";
        }

        return FirstThree + formatDelimiter + MiddleTwo + formatDelimiter + LastFour;
    }
}

By abstracting Social out to a SSN class I now have more control and added functionality over the social security number. When I'm looking for a person by the last four of their social I can easily use the following code:

string lastFour = "0000";
List<Person> Persons = new List<Person>();
Person foundPerson = Persons.Where(x => x.Social.LastFour == lastFour).First();

This is just a small example and it can be expanded out for more complex parts. This will provide the system with better functionality and it will be much easier to understand as well.

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No. I think not. Infragistics ultragrid has over about (on my approximation) less than thousand of properties and methods. And it's running normally. Now what if you put 10 of those controls on your program. No difference either. I think it's safe to assume that you could add as many as you like cause if you have at least unused 1GB memory space,

This is just my approximation, you could have your own too: 1 attribute, average of 250 bytes (1 character = 2 bytes) so,

1 073 741 824/250 bytes = 4 294 967.3 properties

plus you also have your HD's virtual memory as backup.

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Are you encouraging me to put all the properties in one classe ? –  Christophe Jun 19 '12 at 16:13
    
This makes the ultragrid really difficult to work with. One can't see the tree for the woods. –  Oded Jun 19 '12 at 16:24

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