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I can't find a standardised way of getting Maven to do Tomcat 7 deployments that make use of Tomcat 7's parallel deployments:

http://tomcat.apache.org/tomcat-7.0-doc/config/context.html#Parallel_deployment

Is there a solid way to do this? Maybe always keeping two versions of the app live?

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I've no experience with MTOMCAT, but can you define the name of the WAR file that you will be deploying? If so, just make sure that it's called mywebapp##version.war. – Christopher Schultz Jun 19 '12 at 16:17
up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can use the tomcat7-maven-plugin for this usecase :

        <plugin>
            <groupId>org.apache.tomcat.maven</groupId>
            <artifactId>tomcat7-maven-plugin</artifactId>
            <version>2.2</version>
            <configuration>
                <path>/WebappName##${maven.build.timestamp}</path>
                <url>http://localhost:8080/manager/text</url>
                <username>tomcat</username>
                <password>tomcat</password>
                <update>true</update>
            </configuration>
        </plugin>

As you can see the version is specified in the path element, based on the build timestamp in this example.

Of course, you still need to use undeployOldVersions="true" in your server.xml <Host> element if you do not want to keep all the older version running.

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This is what I was getting at in my question How do I get Maven to create an appropriately named .war for use with Tomcat 7's parallel deployment feature?.

Your question is really the gist of it. Below is what I did.

First, get Maven to generate the correctly named .war file. I used Maven's timestamp plugin.

...
<plugin>
    <artifactId>maven-war-plugin</artifactId>
    <version>${war.version}</version>
    <configuration>
        <warName>${war.name}</warName>
    </configuration>
</plugin>
...

Using timestamp as version guarantees that the .war file is named correctly according to the rules Tomcat 7 uses to decide the latest version.

I could not find any information on getting the Tomcat 7 Maven plugin to work with this. Asked on the Tomcat IRC & on Maven IRC. Maybe it's possible, but I couldn't get it to work.

What I did was this:

...
<plugin>
    <groupId>org.apache.maven.plugins</groupId>
    <artifactId>maven-dependency-plugin</artifactId>
    <executions>
        <execution>
            <id>copy</id>
            <phase>install</phase>
            <goals>
                <goal>copy</goal>
            </goals>
            <configuration>
                <artifactItems>
                    <artifactItem>
                        <groupId>${group.id}</groupId>
                        <artifactId>${artifact.id}</artifactId>
                        <version>${version}</version>
                        <type>war</type>
                        <overWrite>true</overWrite>
                        <outputDirectory>${autodeploy.directory}</outputDirectory>
                        <destFileName>${war.name}.war</destFileName>
                    </artifactItem>
                </artifactItems>
            </configuration>
        </execution>
    </executions>
</plugin>
...

That just copies a file from one place to the other. In this case, the .war you built to Tomcat's autodeploy directory.

If you use Jenkins for deployment, you can set up the copy as a post-build action. (Use target/appname*.war for EAR/WAR filename.)

Just for completeness, here are various properties referred to:

<properties>
    <artifact.id>myApp</artifact.id>
    <version>1.0</version>      
    <group.id>com.example.${artifact.id}</group.id>
    <autodeploy.directory xml:space="preserve">C:\Program Files\Apache Software Foundation\Tomcat 7.0\webapps</autodeploy.directory>
    <war.name>${artifact.id}##${maven.build.timestamp}</war.name>    
...

(Note the xml:space="preserve" to make Windows happy when there are spaces in the dir.)

Tomcat 7 will autodeploy by default, but will not remove old versions. Maybe that's what you want, because you'll have all the old versions available in case you screwed something up and need to undeploy the latest.

But if you want to write in pen, so to speak, find conf/server.xml from your Tomcat 7 install dir. Make <Host> look something like this:

<Host appBase="webapps" autoDeploy="true" name="localhost" unpackWARs="true" undeployOldVersions="true">

undeployOldVersions="true" is the magic.

That's it really. Now, when you do maven clean install, it'll build a nicely named war and throw it into Tomcat's autodeploy directory, and it should just work.

-Colin

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Thank you for sharing this gem ! Just another addition, to adjust the timestamp format, one can follow the instruction available here : maven.apache.org/guides/introduction/… – bertie Oct 30 '13 at 15:12

Same here, so I wrote a script to do exactly that with Maven, see http://tynamo.org/Zero+downtime+deployment+to+Tomcat+7+with+Maven. Also, Tomcat 7.0.31 will have undeployOldVersions (see https://issues.apache.org/bugzilla/show_bug.cgi?id=52777).

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Doing this directly through Maven may be a challenge. You could try getting Maven to apply its version number to the WAR file when packaging occurs and then deploy it.

As far as the old version, the "undeployOldVersions" property will let Tomcat remove the old version when it's no longer in use.

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You could try using a better Tomcat manager like MeerCat : http://www.meercatmanager.com

It doesn't use Maven, but it is possible to deploy the same application on multiple Tomcat server instances and easily manage their deployments. Check it out !

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The solution is to use the Cargo plugin.

Please find below 3 profiles that allows you to:

  • Locally deploy to a Tomcat automatically installed by Cargo
  • Locally deploy to a Tomcat already installed and started
  • Remote deploy.

Note the 'context' property that allows renaming the artifact during deployment using ## for parallel deployment.

<profiles>
    <profile>
        <!-- Local deploy - tomcat 7 automatically installed by Cargo -->
        <id>local_deploy_auto_install</id>
        <build>
            <plugins>
                <plugin>
                    <groupId>org.codehaus.cargo</groupId>
                    <artifactId>cargo-maven2-plugin</artifactId>
                    <configuration>
                        <container>
                            <containerId>tomcat7x</containerId>
                            <zipUrlInstaller>
                                <url>http://archive.apache.org/dist/tomcat/tomcat-7/v7.0.35/bin/apache-tomcat-7.0.35.zip</url>
                            </zipUrlInstaller>
                        </container>
                        <deployables>
                            <deployable>
                                <properties>
                                    <context>${project.artifactId}##${project.version}</context>
                                </properties>
                            </deployable>
                        </deployables>
                        <configuration>
                            <properties>
                                <cargo.servlet.port>9080</cargo.servlet.port>
                            </properties>
                        </configuration>
                    </configuration>
                </plugin>
            </plugins>
        </build>
    </profile>

    <profile>
        <!-- Local deploy - tomcat 7 must have been installed and started -->
        <id>local_deploy</id>
        <build>
            <plugins>
                <plugin>
                    <groupId>org.codehaus.cargo</groupId>
                    <artifactId>cargo-maven2-plugin</artifactId>
                    <configuration>
                        <!-- When Cargo starts the container, the following tag instructs it to wait for you to kill the session with Crtl-C -->
                        <!-- <wait>true</wait> -->
                        <!-- The following tag details the container you want to deploy to. -->
                        <container>
                            <!-- Specifying "tomcat7x" is very important! This one tripped me up for quite a while. The issue is that instead 
                                of being an identifier for you, "tomcat7x" is an identifier for Cargo that you want to deploy your webapp in Tomcat 7.x. 
                                I had initially thought otherwise and hence just dropped the 'x', making it "tomcat7", but that never worked. -->
                            <containerId>tomcat7x</containerId>
                            <!-- Type == Installed means that you want to deploy to a container that's installed on your computer -->
                            <type>installed</type>
                        </container>
                        <configuration>
                            <!-- This is another one that confused me for long. Its not enough to specify 'installed' in the container tag. You 
                                have to now specify another configuration with type == existing and the home path -->
                            <type>existing</type>
                            <home>${basedir}/../../tomcat7.0.37</home>
                        </configuration>
                        <!-- Here you specify 'deployables' -->
                        <deployables>
                            <!-- This deployable specifies the webapp you want to deploy -->
                            <deployable>
                                <properties>
                                    <context>${project.artifactId}##${project.version}</context>
                                </properties>
                            </deployable>
                        </deployables>
                    </configuration>
                    <!-- Executions specify the targets that you want to run during build -->
                    <executions>
                        <!-- Maven has the concept of a 'phase' which can be thought of a collection of goals. Hence here we are specifying 
                            that during the 'install' phase first deploy the webapp to the container specific folder and then start the container. Both 
                            'deployer-deploy' and 'start' are cargo specific goals. -->
                        <execution>
                            <id>verify-deploy</id>
                            <phase>install</phase>
                            <goals>
                                <goal>deploy</goal>
                            </goals>
                        </execution>
                    </executions>
                </plugin>
            </plugins>
        </build>
    </profile>

    <profile>
        <!-- Remote dans un tomcat7 pré-installé, pré-démarré -->
        <id>remote_deploy</id>
        <build>
            <plugins>
                <plugin>
                    <groupId>org.codehaus.cargo</groupId>
                    <artifactId>cargo-maven2-plugin</artifactId>
                    <configuration>
                        <!-- When Cargo starts the container, the following tag instructs it to wait for you to kill the session with Crtl-C -->
                        <!-- <wait>true</wait> -->
                        <!-- The following tag details the container you want to deploy to. -->
                        <container>
                            <!-- Specifying "tomcat7x" is very important! This one tripped me up for quite a while. The issue is that instead 
                                of being an identifier for you, "tomcat7x" is an identifier for Cargo that you want to deploy your webapp in Tomcat 7.x. 
                                I had initially thought otherwise and hence just dropped the 'x', making it "tomcat7", but that never worked. -->
                            <containerId>tomcat7x</containerId>
                            <!-- Type == Installed means that you want to deploy to a container that's installed on your computer -->
                            <type>remote</type>
                        </container>
                        <configuration>
                            <!-- This is another one that confused me for long. Its not enough to specify 'installed' in the container tag. You 
                                have to now specify another configuration with type == existing and re-issue the home path -->
                            <type>runtime</type>
                            <properties>
                                <cargo.protocol>http</cargo.protocol>
                                <cargo.hostname>192.168.0.6</cargo.hostname>
                                <cargo.servlet.port>8080</cargo.servlet.port>
                                <cargo.remote.username>deploy</cargo.remote.username>
                                <cargo.remote.password>purplerain</cargo.remote.password>
                            </properties>
                        </configuration>
                        <!-- Here you specify 'deployables' -->
                        <deployables>
                            <!-- This deployable specifies the webapp you want to deploy -->
                            <deployable>
                                <properties>
                                    <context>${project.artifactId}##${project.version}</context>
                                </properties>
                            </deployable>
                        </deployables>
                    </configuration>
                    <!-- Executions specify the targets that you want to run during build -->
                    <executions>
                        <!-- Maven has the concept of a 'phase' which can be thought of a collection of goals. Hence here we are specifying 
                            that during the 'install' phase first deploy the webapp to the container specific folder and then start the container. Both 
                            'deployer-deploy' and 'start' are cargo specific goals. -->
                        <execution>
                            <id>verify-deploy</id>
                            <phase>install</phase>
                            <goals>
                                <goal>deploy</goal>
                            </goals>
                        </execution>
                    </executions>
                </plugin>
            </plugins>
        </build>
    </profile>
</profiles>
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