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I'm wrapping an abstract C++ class with SWIG for Python, and am running into seg fault issues. Here is a simplified version of the code I'm dealing with. ("Changes" is an enum.)

Foo.h

class Foo
{
public:
    virtual ~Foo() {};

    virtual void OnStateChange(Changes change) = 0;
};

Then in Python.

test.py

class MyFoo(Foo):
    def __init__(self):
        super(MyFoo).__init__(self)

    def OnStateChange(self, change):
        print("the state has changed to", change)

I then pass an instance of MyFoo to the C++ lib (via a SWIG-wrapped function), and the C++ code attempts to call OnStateChange. The first time it is called I see the output from the print statement, the second time the program crashes with a seg fault.

I have read the SWIG documentation here http://www.swig.org/Doc1.3/Python.html#Python_directors on implementing what I am trying to do and I have directors enabled. I know this may not be enough information to go on, but I've been searching high and low for the past several days and haven't found anything satisfactory. Thanks in advance.

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Can you post enough code so that someone looking at this could actually reproduce the specific error just by compiling + copy/paste? (it would be preferable if you could try to strip out everything that isn't necessary for producing the error--heck, you might even find the problem in the process). Doing this would make it much easier to find an answer. Here's some guidance on how to make an SSCE. – Jeff Tratner Jun 19 '12 at 20:21
    
Thanks for the help. In trying to replicate the issue on a small scale I was able to solve the problem. – Will Sember Jun 20 '12 at 14:36

After trying to create a small example I discovered the issue. I had forgotten that the C++ code was running it's own thread, and trying to call into the Python thread. All that had to be done to solve the problem was add the -threads option to the swig command.

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