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In this example we have 3 related tables on a SQLite database:

CREATE TABLE test1 (
    c1 integer,
    primary key (c1)
);
CREATE TABLE test2 (
    c1 integer,
    c2 integer,
    primary key (c1, c2)
);    
CREATE TABLE test3 (
    c2 integer,
    c3 integer,
    primary key (c2)
);

Now I need to join all tables:

 test1 -> test2 (with c1 column)
          test2 -> test3 (with c2 column).

I have tried this solution but it doesn't run:

SELECT 
   * 
   FROM test1 a 
        LEFT OUTER JOIN test2 b
                        LEFT OUTER JOIN test3 c
                          ON c.c2 = b.c2 
          ON b.c1=a.c1 

It gives me an error: near "ON": syntax error.

Any help ?

share|improve this question
1  
Never used sqlite3, but the correct standard SQL syntax is LEFT OUTER JOIN ... ON ... LEFT OUTER JOIN ... ON ..., and not nested joins. ) –  raina77ow Jun 19 '12 at 17:10
    
I have used this syntax on Oracle, PostgreSQL and SQLServer without any problem. –  ferpega Jun 19 '12 at 17:12
    
Nested joins - or JOIN (one JOIN two JOIN three) ON (one.id = two.id AND two.some_id = three.some_id)? –  raina77ow Jun 19 '12 at 17:15
    
Thanks @raina77ow –  ferpega Jun 19 '12 at 17:26

1 Answer 1

up vote 8 down vote accepted

This is a simple misplacement of your ON statement. This conforms to SQL standard:

SELECT * 
FROM test1 a 
LEFT OUTER JOIN test2 b ON b.c1=a.c1 
LEFT OUTER JOIN test3 c ON c.c2=b.c2 

This is explained in further depth here.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Nathaniel it runs fine. I have used previous sql format for years. But SQLite doesn't like it to much. –  ferpega Jun 19 '12 at 17:26
    
It's possible that specific (fancy?) implementations are able to parse it, but that SQLite just holds to the spec. –  Nathaniel Ford Jun 19 '12 at 17:29

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