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I have an Android class which has a callback from an asynchronous HTTP process, and an enum with a number of status codes in:

public abstract class HttpPackage {

    public enum StatusCode {
        SUCCESS(0),
        NOT_FOUND(100),
        USERNAME_NOT_FOUND(101),
        AUTH_FAILED(110),
        SAVE_ERROR(111)
        //etc.

        private final int mCode;

        StatusCode(int i) {
            mCode = i;
            sByCode.put(i, this);
        }

    }

    private static final HashMap<Integer, StatusCode> sByCode = new HashMap<Integer, StatusCode>();

    //...
}

I've discovered the callback in the HttpPackage class is being hit before the enum constructs, which means that when I try to extract a status code from the static code map, it returns null, and my code thinks all the feeds are failing (when they aren't). Why would this enum be constructing after the callback is hit?

share|improve this question
1  
Why would you bother having an external map of status codes when you already have an enum of status codes? Why not keep it in the enum? – Dave Newton Jun 19 '12 at 17:15
    
It wouldn't compile. I've just discovered that removing the static modifier helps, but this leaves me with no static way to access the map. – Andrew Wyld Jun 19 '12 at 17:26
    
You access it through the enum. – Dave Newton Jun 19 '12 at 17:33
    
No static way. See below. – Andrew Wyld Jun 19 '12 at 17:36
up vote 3 down vote accepted

Classes are loaded lazily in Java. If you access the map before the StatusCode class is loaded, then of course it will be empty.

The map should be in the enum itself. This way, if you're accessing the map, you're guaranteed that the enum class has been loaded, and that the map is not empty. The map should also be hidden from the outside code. You should provide a static StatusCode getByCode(int code) method in the enum.

EDIT: example code:

public enum StatusCode {
    SUCCESS(0),
    NOT_FOUND(100),
    USERNAME_NOT_FOUND(101),
    AUTH_FAILED(110),
    SAVE_ERROR(111);

    private final int code;

    private static final Map<Integer, StatusCode> map = new HashMap<Integer, StatusCode>();

    static {
        for (StatusCode sc : values()) {
            map.put(sc.getCode(), sc);
        }
    }

    StatusCode(int i) {
        this.code = i;
    }

    public static StatusCode getByCode(int code) {
        return map.get(code);
    }

    public int getCode() {
        return code;
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        System.out.println(StatusCode.getByCode(111));
    }
}

Or you could also use a getMap() static method inside the constructor which lazily initializes the map if it's null.

share|improve this answer
    
Also, recall that generic type parameters are erased at compile time, so there's no run-time reference from sByCode to the StatusCode class that would cause the class to be loaded when the map is accessed. – Alex Jun 19 '12 at 17:20
    
If I make sByCode static it won't initialize in the enum constructor and if I don't make it static the getByCode method can't see it. Any thoughts? – Andrew Wyld Jun 19 '12 at 17:28
    
I've solved this using a simple "iterate through the values() and check for equality, returning a match" method, but it seems a shame not to be able to use HashMap. – Andrew Wyld Jun 19 '12 at 17:32
1  
@AndrewWyld the typical way I've seen that worked around is to make sByCode a static member of the enum class, and then in a static initializer block populate it with the enum values. – Alex Jun 19 '12 at 19:03
1  
@AndrewWyld: see my edit for example code. – JB Nizet Jun 19 '12 at 19:09

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