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I am using rails 3.0.9 and devise for authentication. Now I'm trying to use single table inheritance because I need to use polymorphism, so I have two classes: UserType1 and UserType2, which inherit from User class. I need that Devise instance correctly the current_user depending the type of user.

For example,

class User < ActiveRecord::Base
 #devise and other user logic 
end

class UserType1 < User
  def get_some_attribute
     return "Hello, my type is UserType1"
  end
end

class UserType2 < User
  def get_some_attribute
   return "Hello, my type is UserType2"
  end
end

In controller 

class MyController < ApplicationController
  def action
    @message = current_user.get_some_attribute #depending the type using polymorphism
    render :my_view
  end
end
share|improve this question
    
I also has got the same problem – maxiperez Jun 19 '12 at 18:51
    
Have you added the 'type' column in users table? This is what makes Rails STI work. – Salil Jun 21 '12 at 2:25
    
Forget my bounty, current_user is well-instantiated. – Thomas Guillory Mar 12 '13 at 10:38

it's exactly what you need : http://blog.jeffsaracco.com/ruby-on-rails-polymorphic-user-model-with-devise-authentication

you need to override the sign in path method in your application controller, hope it help.

share|improve this answer
    
Sorry, as I said in comments + answer, forget my bounty, current_user is in fact well instantiated by STI mechanism. I put the bounty too fast without testing so far ;) – Thomas Guillory Mar 12 '13 at 11:26
    
no problems, i just try to help :) – senayar Mar 12 '13 at 11:40
    
Link is dead :-(. – Zach Latta Dec 3 '13 at 9:04
    
link updated :) – senayar Dec 3 '13 at 17:05

You will need to add get_some_attribute method inside User model

Module User < ActiveRecord::Base

   #devise and other user logic 

   def get_some_attribute
      #You can put shared logic between the two users type here
   end

end

then, to override it in the user sub types, like this:

Module UserType1 < User

   def get_some_attribute
      super
      return "Hello, my type is UserType1"
   end

end

Module UserType2 < User

   def get_some_attribute
      super
      return "Hello, my type is UserType2"
   end

end

Then, current_user.get_some_attribute will work as you expecting, if you like to read more about overriding methods in Ruby, you can read about it here

I added super as I assumed that you have some shared logic in get_some_attribute, as it will call get_some_attribute in User model, you can remove it if you don't need it.

Good luck!

share|improve this answer
    
I advise you to use only one user type and depend on roles to determine what to do.. – simo Mar 19 '13 at 15:23

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