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When I search for the existence of data in text() of an element using contains, it works for plain data but not when there are carriage returns, new lines/tags in the element content. How to make //td[contains(text(), "")] work in this case? Thank you!

XML :

<table>
  <tr>
    <td>
      Hello world <i> how are you? </i>
      Have a wonderful day.
      Good bye!
    </td>
  </tr>
  <tr>
    <td>
      Hello NJ <i>, how are you?
      Have a wonderful day.</i>
    </td>
  </tr>
</table>

Python :

>>> tdout=open('tdmultiplelines.htm', 'r')
>>> tdouthtml=lh.parse(tdout)
>>> tdout.close()
>>> tdouthtml
<lxml.etree._ElementTree object at 0x2aaae0024368>
>>> tdouthtml.xpath('//td/text()')
['\n      Hello world ', '\n      Have a wonderful day.\n      Good bye!\n    ', '\n      Hello NJ ', '\n    ']
>>> tdouthtml.xpath('//td[contains(text(),"Good bye")]')
[]  ##-> But *Good bye* is already in the `td` contents, though as a list.
>>> tdouthtml.xpath('//td[text() = "\n      Hello world "]')
[<Element td at 0x2aaae005c410>]
share|improve this question
up vote 3 down vote accepted

Use:

//td[text()[contains(.,'Good bye')]]

Explanation:

The reason for the problem is not that a text node's string value is a multiline string -- the real reason is that the td element has more than one text-node children.

In the provided expression:

//td[contains(text(),"Good bye")]

the first argument passed to the function contains() is a node-set of more than one text nodes.

As per XPath 1.0 specification (in XPath 2.0 this simply raises a type error), a the evaluation of a function that expects a string argument but is passed a node-set instead, takes the string value only of the 1st node in the node-set.

In this specific case, the first text node of the passed node-set has string value:

 "
                 Hello world "

so the comparison fails and the wanted td element isn't selected.

XSLT - based verification:

<xsl:stylesheet version="1.0"
 xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform">
 <xsl:output omit-xml-declaration="yes" indent="yes"/>

 <xsl:template match="/">
  <xsl:copy-of select="//td[text()[contains(.,'Good bye')]]"/>
 </xsl:template>
</xsl:stylesheet>

When this transformation is applied on the provided XML document:

<table>
      <tr>
        <td>
          Hello world <i> how are you? </i>
          Have a wonderful day.
          Good bye!
        </td>
      </tr>
      <tr>
        <td>
          Hello NJ <i>, how are you?
          Have a wonderful day.</i>
        </td>
      </tr>
</table>

the XPath expression is evaluated and the selected nodes (in this case just one) are copied to the output:

<td>
          Hello world <i> how are you? </i>
          Have a wonderful day.
          Good bye!
        </td>
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the explanation! //td[text()[contains(.,'Good bye')]] is analogous to this //td[contains(.,"Good bye")] as I see it. Choosing this as answer for helping me and others to understand this! – ThinkCode Jun 20 '12 at 13:09
    
@ThinkCode: You are welcome. Actually, //td[contains(.,"Good bye")] may lead to false positives, because . is converted to the string value of the context node. If the element has more than one text node descendents, all of them are concatenated in forming its string value. You may not be wanting an element selected if it has two consecutive text-node descendents the first ending in a starting substring of the search string and the second starting in the rest of the search string. – Dimitre Novatchev Jun 20 '12 at 13:20
    
Hmmm, I am a little bit confused. Can you please give us an example showing the difference between both the implementations? Thank you so much! – ThinkCode Jun 20 '12 at 13:27
2  
@ThinkCode: <x>string1<y>string2string3</y> and you are looking for a text node that contains string1string2 – Dimitre Novatchev Jun 20 '12 at 13:32
1  
@ThinkCode: In my solution I check if there is any text node that contains (entirely in itself) the whole search string. So, if you were searching, say, for "core" and there were two consecutive text nodes: "Humphry & co" and "related", the other solution would select the parent of these text nodes -- while my solution wouldn't. – Dimitre Novatchev Jun 20 '12 at 14:30

Use . instead of text():

tdouthtml.xpath('//td[contains(.,"Good bye")]')
share|improve this answer

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