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Upon visiting an older site it can be common to find deprecated tags and attributes. Yet as the are deprecated and not obsolete, they are still valid and supported. A 'good' programmer tends to stay away from these if at all possible, yet just how bad is it to use these?

Upon looking up information about deprecated elements, I find the most common information supplied is:

Browsers should continue to support deprecated tags and attributes, but eventually these tags are likely to become obsolete and so future support cannot be guaranteed.

Obviously if something breaks you should change it. Yet should we actively change instances of deprecated elements in code we had worked on previously? Either a personal site, or a huge site with a huge view rate, just how important is it to stay as up-to-date on accepted elements?

How much warning after a tag or attribute becomes deprecated is given when it is decided it will become obsolete? Any? What about other web formats?

On any site, be it an over-haul, or just noticing a line of deprecated code, should it all be actively removed? Or is it worth the saved time and energy to just wait until is is truly dropped and change it all at once?

Should you lazy (like I wish I could be), or is it worth the effort to be that up-to-date?

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closed as off topic by Pointy, John Conde, Sparky, Jukka K. Korpela, Ja͢ck Jun 19 '12 at 19:05

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I will personally come and hunt you down if you use the <font> tag just because it'll continue to be supported. –  BoltClock Jun 19 '12 at 18:35
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Why are you calling them "deprecated values"? In programming, a "value" is a very specific thing and it's not to what you're referring. –  Sparky Jun 19 '12 at 18:35
    
<center>_</center> –  Ohgodwhy Jun 19 '12 at 18:35
    
@Sparky672 Good point, I changed to tags and attributes or elements. Is that better? I feel saying tags and attributes each time makes it annoying to read, so I quickly picked a (bad) word to encompass them. –  Fewfre Jun 19 '12 at 18:40

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up vote 8 down vote accepted

Should you just be lazy (like I wish I could be), or is it worth the effort to be that up-to-date?

It's always important to be lazy, that's why we have tags marked as deprecated instead of just removed.

I always tell developers to be lazy, but only lazy enough to not stop yourself from preventing yourself from doing good things. There's such a thing as too lazy, and such a thing as not lazy enough. DRY is an example of good lazy. Relying on deprecated tags is an example of bad lazy. Using divs for table layout is an example of inefficient overwork.

On any site, be it an over-haul, or just noticing a line of deprecated code, should it all be actively removed? Or is it worth the saved time and energy to just wait until is is truly dropped and change it all at once?

If you're doing maintenance, and it's a bug report, it's always important to fix it, obviously, but in the case of being proactive, the question becomes, what's the most important thing for you to do right now. If you have some 20% time and you want to fix it, then fix it. If you have tasks that need to be done, then you need to focus on those first.

Either a personal site, or a huge site with a huge view rate, just how important is it to stay as up-to-date on accepted values?

This is really what you're asking about. On your own personal site, that's definitely 20% time, so do that as you want.

On a massive site with lots of throughput, you need to try and keep it up to date so it continues to offer good benefit to the users. If the site suddenly stops working for lots of users, they're going to stop coming. Then a massive site with lots of throughput turns into a dead site taking up space on the internet.

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+1 for a common sense response. I was expecting the typical 'you must erase the file, wipe the server's hard drive with acid and redo the whole site from scratch!' approach I usually read in SO. I 100% agree. If you're looking at old code for some reason and notice something easily fixed, sure fix it there (like, a <font> for a <div style='blah'>), but I don't see a need to do a full site re-engineering for this. Deprecated tags work and will still work for ages, as browsers still need to show pages made 6 years ago. –  Rodolfo Jun 19 '12 at 18:41
    
@Rodolfo I agree, I expected extreme responses also. Thanks both for answers, makes me feel a bit better about not always changing them, but being a little OCD when it's quick. –  Fewfre Jun 19 '12 at 18:57
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another important thing is that, sometimes a change that looks easy may not be so. Say you find a <font> and decide to change it for <span>s. What happens if there is some jquery like $("font").css("padding-left:5px")?... it stops working. –  Rodolfo Jun 19 '12 at 19:04
    
So in that case changing it all at once is better. So really it comes down to how sure you are it's an 'unimportant' item? –  Fewfre Jun 19 '12 at 19:10
    
Generally so, yes. –  jcolebrand Jun 19 '12 at 19:19

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