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I am storing values in an array using the push function. The first value in array is being stored at 4 element instead of first element. For instance, after storing values when I print first element $array[1] it prints space/nothing but when I print the fourth element $array[4] it prints the first value. Any suggestions on how to remove unwanted values in beginning of array?

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3  
What are you pushing in your array? that might be the problem. Sounds like you're pushing an array in another one instead of pushing a scalar. By the way, the first element is at index 0, not 1 . –  jeje Jul 10 '09 at 17:20
    
@ jeje: I am pushing in values after matching regex. something like this: push (@value, join("",$file=~ /$find/)) –  shubster Jul 10 '09 at 17:46
    
@shubster Ok, so you push an array (apparently of 5 elements) in your array @value. –  jeje Jul 10 '09 at 18:02
    
You're probably using a capture in your regex where you don't actually want a capture. –  Brad Gilbert Jul 10 '09 at 20:01

4 Answers 4

You can remove elements from the front of an array with the 'shift' operator.

But I think the problem is deeper than that and you're looking at it the wrong way. If you are storing unknown, 'unwanted' values in an array, you need to figure out where and why that is happening and prevent it, not just bypass those to find what you are looking for.

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while ( value_meets_shubster_s_definition_of_crap($array[0]) ) {
  shift @array;
}

sub value_meets_shubster_s_definition_of_crap {
  my $value = shift;
  &helip;
  return true or false;
}

… but it would be better to avoid putting "crap" values onto the array in the first place.

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"it would be better to avoid putting "crap" values onto the array in the first place." - Thanks for this, I had forgotten a golden rule. –  Structure Oct 1 '10 at 1:31

How are you creating the array? Using my amazing powers of ESP, I'm going to guess that you have a split somewhere that is keeping leading empty fields. If I'm wrong, you'll have to tell us more about what you are doing.

You have a bit of an XY problem here. You're asking us how to implement a solution you've already chosen rather than letting us actually fix the problem.

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If you want to eliminate all unwanted values:

@array = grep { not value_meets_shubster_s_definition_of_crap($_) } @array;

However, as pointed out by David Dorward, this eliminates unwanted values from the middle of the array as well. To get rid of only the values at the beginning, you can use first_index from List::MoreUtils which might be more efficient than a loop of shifts:

#!/usr/bin/perl

use strict;
use warnings;

use List::MoreUtils qw( first_index );

my @array = ( 0, 1, 0, 2 );
my $begin = first_index { not is_unwanted($_) } @array;

@array = @array[ $begin .. $#array ];

print "@array\n";

sub is_unwanted {
    my ($v) = @_;
    return if $v;
    return 1;
}

__END__

Output:

C:Temp> yjk
1 0 2

Update: My hunch seems to have been wrong:

#!/usr/bin/perl

use strict;
use warnings;

use Benchmark qw( cmpthese );
use List::MoreUtils qw( first_index );

my @array = ( 0, 1, 0, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9 );

cmpthese -10, {
    'first_index' => \&using_first_index,
    'shift'       => \&using_shift,
    'nop'         => \&nop,
};

sub using_first_index {
    my @result = @array;
    my $begin = first_index { not is_unwanted($_) } @result;
    @result = @result[ $begin .. $#result ];
}

sub using_shift {
    my @result = @array;
    shift @result while is_unwanted($result[0]);
}

sub nop { my @result = @array; }

sub is_unwanted {
    my ($v) = @_;
    return if $v;
    return 1;
}

Results:

                Rate first_index       shift         nop
first_index  75767/s          --        -71%        -89%
shift       258810/s        242%          --        -61%
nop         664021/s        776%        157%          --
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1  
This would let "crap" values in the middle of the array through. The question did specify the beginning :) –  Quentin Jul 10 '09 at 17:47
    
@David Dorward: ITYM eliminate. –  Sinan Ünür Jul 10 '09 at 17:58

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