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I have a List with numbers, I'd like to find the position of the minimum (not value) using LINQ

eg: {3,1,0,5} output = 2

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2  
are the values always going to be distinct? –  Amir Jul 10 '09 at 17:18
    
no, the values are not unique –  newUser Jul 10 '09 at 17:26
    
Hmmm, if the values are not unique, then I suppose one might want to find multiple positions. Or the position of the first minimum value encountered. –  DavidRR Dec 18 '13 at 14:36
    
If instead you wanted a collection of unique values, then you'd want consider using a collection class that inherits from ISet<T>: that is HashSet<T> or SortedSet<T>. –  DavidRR Dec 18 '13 at 14:50

8 Answers 8

up vote 54 down vote accepted
var list = new List<int> { 3, 1, 0, 5 };
int pos = list.IndexOf(list.Min()); // returns 2
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2  
What happens if there's another item in the list that's also 0? I'm not criticizing, I just want to know. –  mgroves Jul 10 '09 at 17:20
1  
do list generic objects keep track of the min value in them? –  maxwellb Jul 10 '09 at 17:21
3  
@mgroves - It returns the first index of the minimum –  John Rasch Jul 10 '09 at 17:21
2  
I think IndexOf returns the first index of the specified parameter, or -1 if not found. –  maxwellb Jul 10 '09 at 17:21
3  
(IndexOf) Searches for the specified object and returns the zero-based index of the first occurrence within the entire List<(Of <(T>)>). msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/e4w08k17.aspx –  Greg Jul 10 '09 at 17:22

As you specifically asked for a LINQ solution, and all you got was non-LINQ solutions, here's a LINQ solution:

List<int> values = new List<int> { 3, 1, 0, 5 };

int index =
   values
   .Select((n, i) => new { Value = n, Index = i })
   .OrderBy(n=>n.Value)
   .First()
   .Index;

That however doesn't mean that LINQ is the best solution for this problem...

Edit:

With a bit more complex code this performs a little better:

int index =
   values
   .Select((n, i) => new { Value = n, Index = i })
   .Aggregate((a,b) => a.Value < b.Value ? a : b)
   .Index;

To get the best performance, you would use a plain loop go get through the items, while you keep track of the lowest:

int index = 0, value = values[0];
for (int i = 1; i < values.Length; i++) {
  if (values[i] < value) {
    value = values[i];
    index = i;
  }
}
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1  
Technically someone else added the LINQ requirement –  John Rasch Jul 10 '09 at 17:30
    
Actually, it appears the original poster tagged it LINQ, but didn't mention LINQ in the post. –  Don Kirkby Jul 17 '09 at 16:42
    
Do you happen to know how this works with the "nice" syntax? –  colithium Oct 24 '11 at 10:15
    
Why the downvote? If you don't explain what you think is wrong, it can't improve the answer. –  Guffa Jul 17 '12 at 12:06
1  
@JulienGuertault: Fair point. I added an alternative with better performance. Now go downvote the accepted answer, which does a lot more work that it has to... ;) –  Guffa May 23 '14 at 8:51
var data = new List<int> { 3, 1, 0, 5 };

var result = Enumerable.Range(0, data.Count).OrderBy(n => data[n]).First();
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Why is there no MinBy... the Min overloads are useless... –  dtb Jul 10 '09 at 17:25

I agree that LINQ isn't the best solution for this problem, but here's another variation that is O(n). It doesn't sort and only traverses the list once.

var list = new List<int> { 3, 1, 0, 5 };
int pos = Enumerable.Range(0, list.Count)
    .Aggregate((a, b) => (list[a] < list[b]) ? a : b); // returns 2
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List<int> data = new List<int>();
data.AddRange(new[] { 3, 1, 0, 5 });
Console.WriteLine(data.IndexOf(data.Min()));
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int min = 0;
bool minIsSet = false;

var result = ints
  .Select( (x, i) => new {x, i}
  .OrderBy(z => z.x)
  .Select(z => 
  {
    if (!minIsSet)
    {
      min = z.x;
      minIsSet = true;
    }
    return z;
  }
  .TakeWhile(z => z.x == min)
  .Select(z => z.i);
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I don't necessarily recommend this CPS-style code, but it works and is O(n), unlike the solutions that use OrderBy:

var minIndex = list.Aggregate(
    new { i = 0, mini = -1, minv = int.MaxValue },
    (min, x) => (min.minv > x)
        ? new { i = min.i + 1, mini = min.i, minv = x }
        : new { i = min.i + 1, mini = min.mini, minv = min.minv })
    .mini;

Change > to >= if you want the last minimum duplicate, not the first.

Use .minv to get the minimum value or neither to get a 2-tuple with both the index and the minimum value.

I can't wait for .NET to get tuples in 4.0.

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List<int>.Enumerator e = l.GetEnumerator();
int p = 0, min = int.MaxValue, pos = -1;
while (e.MoveNext())
{
    if (e.Current < min)
    {
        min = e.Current;
        pos = p;
    }
    ++p;
}
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1  
This answer was humoristic I think :) –  Softlion Oct 27 '11 at 9:08

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