Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

class OneAtATimePlease
{
    static void Main()
    {

        using (var mutex = new Mutex(false, "oreilly.com OneAtATimeDemo"))
        {
            if (mutex.WaitOne(TimeSpan.FromSeconds(3), false))
                RunProgram();
            else
            {
                Console.WriteLine("Another instance of the app is running. Bye!");
                return;
            }
        }
    }
    static void RunProgram()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Running. Press Enter to exit");
        Console.ReadLine();
    }
}

but those lines waits for someone to call Set() function :

 if (mutex.WaitOne(TimeSpan.FromSeconds(3), false))
                RunProgram();

who is calling set here ? this thread will never be released...(or will?)

what am i missing ?

share|improve this question
2  
On exit, the program which runs the mutex will exit, causing mutex.WaitOne to return on the others.... –  Karthik Kumar Viswanathan Jun 19 '12 at 19:43
    
@KarthikKumarViswanathan this program also runs the mutex and it doesnt call Set. –  Royi Namir Jun 19 '12 at 19:46

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

WaitOne() immediately returns with a true if someone's not running it. Else, it blocks! The program which then finishes, causes one of the waiting programs to return with a true immediately.

share|improve this answer
    
msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/58195swd.aspx Blocks the current thread until the current WaitHandle receives a signal. ???? –  Royi Namir Jun 19 '12 at 19:49
1  
Yes. a signal is thrown on program exit. –  Karthik Kumar Viswanathan Jun 19 '12 at 19:50
    
if i activated my program and only running 1 instance , will it return true ? ( there wont be a signal which is thrown on program exitsince there is no program exit) –  Royi Namir Jun 19 '12 at 19:52
    
yes. Technically, one is supposed to run a mutex.releaseMutex() after RunProgram()... Else, you'll leave the mutex in a dangling state... I think you should read this: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/… ... Prior to .net 2, that was an acceptable way to do single instances. Just that today, it isn't documented as acceptable behavior anymore. –  Karthik Kumar Viswanathan Jun 19 '12 at 19:54
    
WaitOne() immediately returns with a true if someone's not running it where does it written ? –  Royi Namir Jun 19 '12 at 19:57

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.