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In my Java app, I'm looking for a streaming version of URLEncoder.encode(String s, String enc). I'd like to stream a large HTTP post request using the "application/x-www-form-urlencoded" content type. Does such a thing exist either in a library, or an open source project? Or is there an easy way to implement it?

This was an early attempt, but is incorrect because it doesn't handle UTF codepoints larger than one byte:

// Incorrect attempt at creating a URLEncoder OutputStream
private class URLEncoderOutputStream extends FilterOutputStream
{
    public URLEncoderOutputStream(OutputStream out)
    {
        super(out);
    }

    @Override
    public void write(int b) throws IOException
    {
        String s = new String(new byte[] { (byte)b });
        String enc = URLEncoder.encode(s, "UTF-8");
        out.write(enc.getBytes("UTF-8"));
    }
}
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What do you want to send? A very large text the user enters? –  Paul Vargas Jun 19 '12 at 20:33

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The problem is that OutputStreams don't know anything about characters, only bytes. What you really want is a Writer, e.g.

public class URLEncodedWriter extends FilterWriter {
    public void write(int c) {
        out.write(URLEncoder.encode((char)c, "UTF-8"));
    }
    ... // Same for 2 other write() methods
}
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I think the answer is I shouldn't be trying to do this. According to the HTML Specification:

The content type "application/x-www-form-urlencoded" is inefficient for sending large quantities of binary data or text containing non-ASCII characters. The content type "multipart/form-data" should be used for submitting forms that contain files, non-ASCII data, and binary data.

Most servers will reject HTTP headers that exceed a certain length in any case.

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1  
Yes, Apache will truncate at 8kB of headers. You can pass as much in the body as you want though when doing a POST. –  Bill Brasky Jun 19 '12 at 21:36
    
Would the content in this case be be part of the header or body of the request? –  sallen Jun 19 '12 at 21:50
    
@sallen Content = body. –  EJP Jun 19 '12 at 22:21

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