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Let say, that i have defined the same function for windows and mac, with different return values like this:

#ifdef _WIN32

// Windows code
int porting(int input){
  return input + 360;
}

#endif

#ifdef __APPLE__

// Mac code
int porting(int input){
  return input + 180;
}

#endif

Is there a way to allow the user to specify code to run inside porting(), instead of having multiple definitions?

share|improve this question

closed as not a real question by 0A0D, Dan F, akappa, Soner Gönül, Richard J. Ross III Jun 19 '12 at 20:42

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

11  
This is not at all clear. – Oliver Charlesworth Jun 19 '12 at 20:17
    
Do you mean having the declaration and definition separated? Just use the same #defines in both places. – chris Jun 19 '12 at 20:18
    
No, no.. let say your function is named chris, instead of using chris(); you can place a code inside chris and then use chris... – user1417815 Jun 19 '12 at 20:20
    
Here on StackOverflow, it is common courtesy to put some effort into properly formatting your posts. – Alex Lockwood Jun 19 '12 at 20:20
    
Are you asking about using recursion then? – Dan F Jun 19 '12 at 20:24
up vote 1 down vote accepted

C++, as a compiled language, has no eval() function, which many interpreted languages (such as PHP or Javascript) have. There is no way to execute textual user-supplied code at runtime.

Perhaps a callback would suffice for your needs?

Example:

typedef int (*userfunction)(int);

userfunction thefunction;

void set_user_function(userfunction uf)
{
    thefunction = uf;
}

int porting(int input)
{
    return thefunction(input);
}
share|improve this answer
    
I dont want to redefine, but i want to place something inside it.. i saw some place.. people who did it.. – user1417815 Jun 19 '12 at 20:27
    
@user1417815 - Just type the code you want inside it? Do you have a link to what you saw? – Unsigned Jun 19 '12 at 20:28
    
Let say your function is : int Unsigned (int input) { }, how can you let the user to place a code inside it, think about it like threads.. – user1417815 Jun 19 '12 at 20:31
1  
@user1417815 - C++ is a compiled language, and has no eval(), which many interpreted languages (such as PHP or Javascript) have. Is this what you are asking? – Unsigned Jun 19 '12 at 20:34
    
Thanks, that explained it good! – user1417815 Jun 19 '12 at 20:42

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