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I have a table School and a table Teacher having a one-to-many relationship. However, one of the teachers is the school's principle, and only one teacher can be the school principle. So I thought of saving the teachers id (principle) in the School table as follows:

CREATE TABLE School (
    ID INT PRIMARY KEY,
    Name VARCHAR(40),
    PrincipleID INT FOREIGN KEY REFERENCES Teacher.ID
)

CREATE TABLE Teacher (
    ID INT PRIMARY KEY,
    Name VARCHAR(40),
    SchoolID INT FOREIGN KEY REFERENCES School.ID
)

I know I could loose the foreign key reference in the school table, but that's not an option.

Should I make the reference after the table creation? If yes, how?

share|improve this question
    
Please see my edit, making bidirectional relationship is not a good practice although. – Shantanu Gupta Jun 19 '12 at 20:45
    
I would hope that a school has many good principles, but yes, you usually want only one person to hold the job of 'principal' – Clockwork-Muse Jun 19 '12 at 23:18
up vote 3 down vote accepted

Another solution is to create a new table, let's say SchoolsPrinciples with just two fields:

CREATE TABLE SchoolsPrinciples
(
  SchoolId int,
  TeacherId int,
  CONSTRAINT uc_SchoolTeacher UNIQUE (SchoolId, TeacherId)
)

A UNIQUE constraint let you obtain exactly one teacher per each school.

share|improve this answer
    
UNIQUE on which column ? – user1467479 Jun 19 '12 at 20:38
    
@ADC - You typed this faster than I - ALTER TABLE [dbo].[SchoolsPrincipals] ADD CONSTRAINT UNQ__SchoolPrincipal__SchoolID UNIQUE ([SchoolID]) – user1166147 Jun 19 '12 at 20:43
    
But this won't stop having two principles. school1+teacher1, school1+teacher2 – user1467479 Jun 19 '12 at 20:44
1  
If you enforce the UNIQUE constraint ONLY ON SCHOOLDID, it will allow you to only enter one record for each schoolId. – user1166147 Jun 19 '12 at 20:47
    
Yes, true. Thank you for your answer, I found many good solutions. – user1467479 Jun 19 '12 at 20:54

When building the tables, you'll need to add the constraint as a separate alter statement. Note also that when creating foreign keys, you should only specify the table name, not the referenced column (the column is implied by the primary key).

CREATE TABLE School (
    ID INT PRIMARY KEY,
    Name VARCHAR(40),
    PrincipleID INT);

CREATE TABLE Teacher (
    ID INT PRIMARY KEY,
    Name VARCHAR(40),
    SchoolID INT 
      CONSTRAINT FK_Teacher_School 
      FOREIGN KEY REFERENCES School);

ALTER TABLE School add
    CONSTRAINT FK_School_Teacher 
    FOREIGN KEY (PrincipleID) REFERENCES Teacher;

When you add data, you'll need to set the PrincipleID field as a separate update:

insert into School (ID, Name)
values (1, 'Blarg Elementary');

insert into Teacher (ID, Name, SchoolID)
values (1, 'John Doe', 1),
       (2, 'Bob Smith', 1),
       (3, 'Adam Walker', 1);

update School set PrincipleID = 2 where ID = 1;
share|improve this answer
    
It is not about inserting values, it is about creating the tables. I cannot create the tables as they are referenced by each other. – user1467479 Jun 19 '12 at 20:31
1  
+1 the ALTER TABLE command is how to add a reference after the table is created. – LesterDove Jun 19 '12 at 20:36
1  
Thank you for your answer! That's what I was looking for. – user1467479 Jun 19 '12 at 20:40

Put a boolean IsPrincipal on the Teacher table instead. Or add a third relationship table

CREATE TABLE SchoolPrincipals (
  INT SchoolID PRIMARY KEY FOREIGN KEY REFERENCES School.ID,
  INT TeacherID FOREIGN KEY REFERENCES Teacher.ID
)

Keeps everything tidy without painful delete logic.

share|improve this answer
1  
It will allow to have multiple principles in the same school, and it is a requirement to only have one principle. – user1467479 Jun 19 '12 at 20:25
    
Structurally, it will allow multiples. You can enforce that through proper data access code. – bluevector Jun 19 '12 at 20:28

You can take a column in Teacher table as

  1. IsPrincipal where only one row will have value as true as referred by jonnyGold,

          This can be checked by triggers.
                        OR
          You can use filtered index if using Sql Server 2008.
               Create unique filtered index where SchoolID, IsPrincipal 
               is NOT NULL and are unique
    
  2. Boss where this will contain ID of principal hence creating employee manager relationship which in your case is not suitable.

CREATE TABLE EmpManager ( TeacherID int SchoolID int IsPrincipal bit ) And use filtered index or trigger to handle the scenario.

EDIT:

CREATE TABLE [dbo].[Teacher](
    [ID] [int] NOT NULL primary key,
    [Name] [varchar](40) NULL,
    [SchoolID] [int] NULL,
) 
GO

CREATE TABLE [dbo].[School](
    [ID] [int] NOT NULL primary key,
    [Name] [varchar](40) NULL,
    [PrincipleID] [int] NULL,
)
GO

ALTER TABLE [dbo].[Teacher]  WITH CHECK ADD  CONSTRAINT [FK_Teacher_School] FOREIGN KEY([SchoolID])
REFERENCES [dbo].[School] ([ID])
GO

ALTER TABLE [dbo].[School]  WITH CHECK ADD  CONSTRAINT [FK_School_Teacher] FOREIGN KEY([PrincipleID])
REFERENCES [dbo].[Teacher] ([ID])
GO

enter image description here

Better design should be the one suggested by ADC

enter image description here

share|improve this answer
    
So you are saying that it is impossible to implement "bi-directional" table relationships? – user1467479 Jun 19 '12 at 20:33
    
@DarDar: It is possible. Employee Manager relationship is an example of bi-directional relationship. – Shantanu Gupta Jun 19 '12 at 20:35
    
Thank you for you answer and effort. Allan's solution is something similar and it is working. Your solution is working as well. Thanks! But anyway, what would be the downside of having bidirectional relationships ? – user1467479 Jun 19 '12 at 20:52
    
Scalability of business requirements sometimes gets sacrificed eg. What if a teacher is a part time employee in one school and is a permanent employee in another school holding designation of principal in both. Considering primary key to be SSN or any business unique key above structure would create a problem. – Shantanu Gupta Jun 19 '12 at 20:56

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