Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Is there a way to disable PHP sending cookies in a specific page's header, on a server that normally uses cookies?

The scenario is that I have a server that uses cookies, but some pages are actually programming API calls that don't need cookies, and in fact slow down the user's API request by sending this irrelevant data.

share|improve this question
1  
Its the browser that sends the cookie when the url matches. Either restrict the path, or use another domain. –  Dagon Jun 19 '12 at 20:28
1  
Define "slow down" –  PeeHaa Jun 19 '12 at 20:30
    
Slow down means slow down the user getting the request because extra data is being sent in cookies (like Google's chunky analytics cookies, and my site's cookies). The cookie data is larger than the API data returned in most cases. –  Michael S Jun 19 '12 at 20:51

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The way that many sites use to serve their static resources without the cookie overhead is using a different domain. For Stack Overflow, for example, that domain is http://sstatic.net

In a web app, you can restrict cookies to a specific path. By default, they will be restricted to the directory in which they were set. You can also explicitly specify it using the $path parameter in setcookie().

share|improve this answer
    
I've got a list of about 9 things I can do to speed up my API requests. Excess cookie data is just one of them. –  Michael S Jun 19 '12 at 20:53
    
@Michael fair enough, it sounds like you know what you're doing –  Pekka 웃 Jun 19 '12 at 20:54
    
A different domain is the obvious solution and what we are moving to now. I was just looking for a temporary 'fix' until we migrate everything to a subdomain. Maybe there is no other solution but I was just checking. –  Michael S Jun 19 '12 at 20:55
    
Thanks for your response! If no one else chimes in with a different solution, I'm going to mark your answer correct since you were first. –  Michael S Jun 19 '12 at 20:57

I agree with Pekka's answer and Dagon's comment. If you look at what goes in an http request with a tool like firebug you'll see that cookies are only sent when there is a setcookie call, however, the browser will always send valid cookies it has for the domain.

The way around this is to use a seperate domain or subdomain for your api. You can also configure the web server supporting the api to disable any support for cookies, however, if your domain has implemented a domain cookie anywhere, you can't stop the clients from sending all the cookie data in the header of their requests. Thus it's probably best if you use an entirely different domain for your api, and avoid cookies entirely in doing so. If you can insure that no domain cookies exist, then subdomains is the next best solution.

share|improve this answer
    
A different domain is the obvious solution and what we are moving to now. I was just looking for a temporary 'fix' until we migrate everything to a subdomain. Maybe there is no other solution but I was just checking. –  Michael S Jun 19 '12 at 20:55
    
Thanks for your response. If no one else chimes in with a different solution, I'm going to mark Pekka's answer correct since he was first. –  Michael S Jun 19 '12 at 20:59
1  
Yes, by all means. My answer just tried to unify Pekka's as well as some of the relevant comments. –  gview Jun 19 '12 at 22:17

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.