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It seems like I heard/read somewhere that DIVs inside of TDs was a no-no. Not that it won't work, just something about them not being really compatible based on their display type. Can't find any evidence to back up my hunch, so I may be totally wrong.

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8 Answers 8

up vote 53 down vote accepted

Using a div instide a td is not worse than any other way of using tables for layout. (Some people never use tables for layout, and I'm one of them.)

If you use a div in a td you will however get in a situation where it might be hard to predict how the elements will be sized. The default for a div is to determine its width from its parent, and the default for a table cell is to determine its size depending on the size of its content.

The rules for how a div should be sized is well defined in the standards, but the rules for how a td should be sized is not as well defined, so different browsers use slightly different algorithms.

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I suspect this is where my hunch came from. Thanks for clearing it up. –  jcollum Jul 13 '09 at 16:27
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If your columns have a pre-specified width, it shouldn't be a problem. Just remember to set table-layout:fixed on the table so browsers don't override your widths (potentially leading to trouble) –  Jens Roland Feb 29 '12 at 11:45

No. Not necessarily.

If you need to place a DIV within a TD, be sure you're using the TD properly. If you don't care about tabular-data, and semantics, then you ultimately won't care about DIVs in TDs. I don't think there's a problem though - if you have to do it, you're fine.

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I've always wanted to answer a question with a yes or a no ;) –  Jani Hartikainen Jul 10 '09 at 17:36
    
+1 - really wanted to answer with something wittier, but failed. –  karim79 Jul 10 '09 at 17:47
    
Even though this got more upvotes I think that Guffa brought up a point that isn't addressed here (and may be the source of my hunch) –  jcollum Jul 13 '09 at 16:44

After checking the XHTML DTD I discovered that a <TD>-element is allowed to contain block elements like headings, lists and also <DIV>-elements. Thus, using a <DIV>-element inside a <TD>-element does not violate the XHTML standard. I'm pretty sure that other modern variations of HTML have an equivalent content model for the <TD>-element.

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A table-cell can legitimately contain block-level elements so it's not, inherently, a faux-pas. Browser implentation, of course, leaves this a speculative-theoretical position. It may cause layout problems and bugs.

Though as tables were used for layout -and sometimes still are- I imagine that most browsers will render the content properly. Even IE.

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I suspect browser implementation is where I got my "wait, that's a bad idea" from. –  jcollum Jul 10 '09 at 17:54

If you want to use position: absolute; on the div with position: relative; on the td you will run into issues. FF, safari, and chrome (mac, not PC though) will not position the div relative to the td (like you would expect) this is also true for divs with display: table-whatever; so if you want to do that you need two divs, one for the container width: 100%; height: 100%; and no border so it fills the td without any visual impact. and then the absolute one.

other than that why not just split the cell?

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The only practical, non-holywar answer –  Antony Hatchkins Jan 17 '12 at 10:22

I have faced the problem by placing a <div> inside <td>.

I was unable to identify the div using document.getElementById() if i place that inside td. But outside, it was working fine.

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As everyone mentioned, it might not be a good idea for layout purposes. I arrived to this question because I was wondering the same and I only wanted to know if it would be valid code.

Since it's valid, you can use it for other purposes. For example, what I'm going to use it for is to put some fancy "CSSed" divs inside table rows and then use a quick jQuery function to allow the user to sort the information by price, name, etc. This way, the only layout table will give me is the "vertical order", but I'll control width, height, background, etc of the divs by CSS.

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It breaks semantics, that's all. It works fine, but there may be screen readers or something down the road that won't enjoy processing your HTML if you "break semantics".

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@Greg, why does it break semantics? A div is simply a block-level division, or sub-division, of the page content. As such it's not essentially and irrevocably anti-semantic to place them within a table cell. –  David Thomas Jul 10 '09 at 17:42
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I tried to write several responses to you that justified my answer, but I kept coming down to personal opinion. :/ I guess my best response would be that whatever is in your cell can probably be better represented by another HTML tag. If you are truly dividing your cells into components, then you probably shouldn't be using a table to begin with, you should be styling a series of DIVs for your layout. Not sure why I can't put this into better words...chalk it up to IMHO, I suppose. –  Greg Jul 10 '09 at 17:53
    
Hmm, do you mean that a TD is semantically the same thing as a DIV so why have two of them in a row? –  jcollum Jul 10 '09 at 17:56
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@jcollum: No, I wouldn't say they are semantically the same. TD is definitely a cell in a table; it's a part of a known structure: a table has rows, a row has cells, cells contain data. DIV is just a container ... it can represent anything at anytime anywhere in the document - you have to apply style to it to get any semantics from it in terms of purpose in the markup. –  Greg Jul 10 '09 at 18:19
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A DIV is semantically meaningless, so I don't see how it could ever be incorrect. –  Rex M Jul 10 '09 at 18:29

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