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I've got abit of a strange problem, that I just can't seem to solve! It's part of a big framework I'm writing, but I've wrote some test code which has the same problem. See the following:

!function ($, window, undefined) {

    // BASE FUNCTION
    var test = function (selector, context) {
        return new test.fn.init(selector, context);
    };

    // SELECTOR FUNCTIONS
    test.fn = {
        selector:   undefined,
        init:       function (selector, context) {
            // Use jQuery to build selector object
            this.selector = $(selector, context);
            return this;
        },

        // Create a popup dialog
        popup:      function (options) {
            this.selector.dialog();
        }
    },

    // Expose Carbon to the global object
    window.test     = test;

}(window.jQuery, window);

Now when I use the following:

test('#popupLink').popup();

I get "TypeError: test("#popupLink").popup is not a function". I know it's partly working, as I can do use standard jQuery functions if I do something like:

test('#popupLink').selector.hide();

Any help would be greatly appreciated, as I'm having a mental block right now. Thanks in advance! :)

Update

I've used console.log to view the returned object, and it only has the selector element in, which makes sense as I didn't use prototype. How can I fix that?

share|improve this question
    
Change test.fn to test.prototype or test.fn.prototype –  jasssonpet Jun 19 '12 at 21:27
    
I've added "test.fn.prototype = test.fn", but it still doesn't work, exactly the same error :( –  jleck Jun 19 '12 at 21:35
    
You must assign popup to the prototype of test.fn.init. –  Felix Kling Jun 19 '12 at 21:48

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted
(function ($, window) {
    // BASE FUNCTION
    var test = function (selector, context) {
        return new test.fn.init(selector, context);
    };

    // SELECTOR FUNCTIONS
    test.fn = test.prototype = {
        constructor: test,
        init: function (selector, context) {
            // Use jQuery to build selector object
            this.selector = $(selector, context);
            return this;
        },

        // Create a popup dialog
        popup: function (options) {
            console.log('popup');
            return this;
        }
    };

    // Expose test to the global object
    window.test = test;
}(window.jQuery, window));

test.fn.init.prototype = test.fn;

You missed the constructor and the prototype chain on the created instances of test.

share|improve this answer
    
Ah, I understand now. Thanks very much! –  jleck Jun 19 '12 at 21:46
    
Actually one more thing, what does "constructor: test" do in this case? –  jleck Jun 19 '12 at 21:53
    
Actually, nevermind worked it out. If you do "new test()", it uses the original test function as the constructor. d'oh! –  jleck Jun 19 '12 at 21:57
    
Returns a reference to the function that created the instance's prototype. Changes it from Object to test, you can remove it if you don't use it. –  jasssonpet Jun 19 '12 at 22:01

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