Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I want to understand the role interface plays in inheritance between two classes.

My understanding is that you can create superclass and subclass with the use of extends.

class Parent {
}
class Child extends Parent {
}

This is already sufficient in creating superclass and subclass.

When do we need interface? Do we need implements for Child or Parent?

class Parent {
}
class Child extends Parent implements MyInterface {
}
interface MyInterface {
}
share|improve this question

closed as too localized by Lion, Chris Dennett, Hovercraft Full Of Eels, Mac, Graviton Jun 20 '12 at 2:56

This question is unlikely to help any future visitors; it is only relevant to a small geographic area, a specific moment in time, or an extraordinarily narrow situation that is not generally applicable to the worldwide audience of the internet. For help making this question more broadly applicable, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

2  
This has been asked so many times. Why not read a Java tutorial about Object Orientation? –  Chris Dennett Jun 19 '12 at 21:51
1  
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Interface_%28Java%29 has a pretty good explanation about why interfaces are handy, and how you use them. –  Eric Jun 19 '12 at 21:52
    
What do you mean "Do we need implements for Child or Parent"? –  Lion Jun 19 '12 at 21:53
    
Chris, this question arose from reading The Java Tutorial. –  dmtri.com Jun 19 '12 at 21:55
    
Lion, I am not sure if implements keyword is applied to Chile or Parent, or both. –  dmtri.com Jun 19 '12 at 21:56
show 1 more comment

4 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Inheritance and interface implementation defines a is-a relationship. This means that is the subclass A extends a superclass B, A is-a B. If the superclass B implements the interface I, B is-a I. And since A is-a A, A is also a I.

For example, a Car (ssuperclass) is a Vehicle (interface). Since Audi extends Car, Audi is also a Vehicle.

A subclass can not be less than its parent, but it can be more. So a child may implement interfaces that its parent class doesn't implement.

For example, all cars are not hybrid (interface). But this doesn't prevent a Prius, which is a Car, to be a hybrid. A Prius is more than just a Car. It's also a hybrid.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for the succinct analogy. –  dmtri.com Jun 19 '12 at 22:05
add comment

The concept of a class inheriting from a base class is independent of a class implementing an interface. In the first case, the inheriting class acquires both the interface and the implementation of its base "for free"; in the second case, a class is checked to comply with the interface that it is declared to implement.

A subclass inherits the interfaces that its base implements, but it is also free to implement additional interfaces. This is very convenient when classes in a single hierarchy must assume multiple roles, depending on their place in the hierarchy.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Basically an interface is used to create guidelines for classes that implement it.

The main diffrences between an interface and a parent class are
1) You cannot instantiate the interface(it doesn't even have a constructor)
2) All its methods must be abstract
3) You must override all interface methods in the class that implements it.

share|improve this answer
add comment
interface MyInterface {
}

class Parent implements MyInterface{
}
class Child extends Parent {
       // Implements MyInterface because it's parent does
}
class Child2 extends Parent implements AnotherInterface {
       //  Child2 class now implements both
       // MyInterface as well as AnotherInterface
}

Not sure if you are asking about extending an interface, but that is also possible:

interface MyInterface {
}

interface MySecondInterface extends MyInterface {
}

You implement an interface when you want your class to use the constants described and define the method signatures contained in the interface.

So, if you want your PARENT class to use the constants and define the methods, then your PARENT implements the interface. If you want your CHILD class class to use the constants and define the methods, then your CHILD implements the interface.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.