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Please note that I am aware of Math.Round thingy. This is a bit more complex question than it seems..

I am trying to implement most efficient scaled rounding using C#. Scaled rounding is to find closest legitimate number. In my case legitimate number is y ~ x * n where y is input number, n is result of the scaled rounding and x is known number.

Implementation could be where x is always int or is always double (whichever solution will turn be faster). x and n are always positive.

example. I have x = 0.0625. And I have input number y = 0.1876. The algorithm need to find n which gives me x * n closest to y.... And be very efficitent CPU-wise! in this example n = 3 => 0.0625 * 3 = 0.1875, 0.0625 * 4 = 0.2500. 0.1876 close to 0.1875 than to 0.25

(I am also OK to use ints instead. it would be x = 625, y = 1876 and n = 3)

Not using Math is encouraged. it is going to run on Xeon E5.

Edit. The answer might not necessarily involve .NET library and could be use simple computation and branching. Hence C and C++ specialists might want to help. Please stop editing the tags. thank you

============================================================

Benchmark shows that there is no difference between using Math.Round and the computation by Yorye Nathan

Here is the code

    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        Stopwatch sw = new Stopwatch();

        Console.Write("Input x: ");

        double x = double.Parse(Console.ReadLine());

        double d = 0;

        sw.Restart();

        for (int z = 0; z < 10; z++)
        {
            for (double i = 0.1; i < 10000; i += 0.0256)
            {
                double a = x * Math.Round(i / x, 0);
                d += a;
            }

            sw.Stop();

            Console.Write("{0} {1} ..", sw.ElapsedTicks, d);

            d = 0;

            sw.Restart();

            for (double i = 0.1; i < 10000; i += 0.0256)
            {
                int n = (int)(i / x + 0.5);
                double a = x * n;
                d += a;
            }

            sw.Stop();

            Console.WriteLine("{0} {1}", sw.ElapsedTicks, d);
        }

        Console.ReadLine();
    }
share|improve this question

closed as not a real question by Anthony Pegram, Ken White, zerkms, L.B, Jesse Good Jun 19 '12 at 23:57

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

5  
I think the default expectation here at SO is a real life problem as opposed to an artificial challenge. What's the real life problem, what exactly are you doing in a loop and what makes you think rounding is the performance bottleneck? –  Seva Alekseyev Jun 19 '12 at 23:46
5  
Please don't micro optimize. –  Cole Johnson Jun 19 '12 at 23:49
5  
If you're asking people to spend their time answering your generic challenge, stop objecting to their asking for details and clarification. Also, arbitrarily deciding you want to apply non-applicable tags isn't appropriate either. If someone familiar with C/C++ sees your question and wants to read it, they will; tags are used to classify questions based on topic, and this is not a C/C++ question. –  Ken White Jun 19 '12 at 23:49
3  
@Bobb please read this –  Cole Johnson Jun 19 '12 at 23:52
2  
Most efficient, memory wise, stack usage, least number of ascii characters, what? –  starbolin Jun 19 '12 at 23:57

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Thanks to zerkms, a better solution has arrived. I've changed his pastebin a bit to support negative numbers as well.

public int Round(double num)
{
    return num > 0 ? (int)(num + 0.5) : (int)(num - 0.5);
}

Usage:

int num = Round(y / x);
share|improve this answer
    
OP mentioned "speed" criteria. Not sure that this has even a chance to be faster than Math.Round() –  zerkms Jun 19 '12 at 23:46
    
yes this is good start. thank you. I would like to find better though as this method is unlikely to be inlined –  Boppity Bop Jun 19 '12 at 23:47
    
@zerkms Improved by much. I doubt it can get any better than this. –  Yorye Nathan Jun 19 '12 at 23:52
1  
@Yorye Nathan: pastebin.com/gyg402x9 –  zerkms Jun 20 '12 at 0:03
1  
@Yorye Nathan: of course not ;-) +1 to you –  zerkms Jun 20 '12 at 0:10

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