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This is the script I have written

zgrep -i xxxx FileA | grep -o "RID=[0-9|A-Z]*" | uniq | cut -d "=" -f2 | xargs

Before the point of xargs being used my o/p is

01982893213982312 - RID 1
32103213213213213 - RID 2
32103213213213343 - RID 3
32103213213251261 - RID 4

For every RID present here, there is a corresponding line in File B. I am planning to do like the below after the:

zgrep -i xxxx FileA | grep -o "RID=[0-9|A-Z]*" | uniq | cut -d "=" -f2 | xargs|
{grep RID1 in file B, grep RID2 in file B,grep RID3 in file B, grep RID4 in file B}

Now my only question is how will I refer RID1,2,3,4 with xargs....

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Can you give a few lines from File A and File B and specify specifically what input you want to give at the shell? What do your scripts look like so far? –  sarnold Jun 20 '12 at 1:59
    
How big is FileA? How many lines, that is? If it is only a few (say, under a thousand), then one set of options is available; if it is large, the options are fewer. Also, is the RID simply one field of many on each line of FileA, or is it the only data on each line? –  Jonathan Leffler Jun 20 '12 at 2:08
    
Actually the size of file A is large more than thousand. Regarding RID Output of file 1, it is say 09877326369900 92828282828 020292929202 . These are the three outputs from file A. Now I need to fetch the corresponding lines of file B that has the output of file A... for this I need to read the output of file A from the console itself and not store it in a temp file –  User Jun 20 '12 at 2:28

2 Answers 2

The other way to do that is to pipe the data such as:

script1 fileA | script2 fileB

This approach allows you to pass more arguments, and stream through fileB..

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How will the second script receives the input one by one from the first –  User Jun 20 '12 at 2:31
    
This is the script I have written zgrep -i xxxx FileA|grep -o "RID=[0-9|A-Z]*"|uniq|cut -d "=" -f2|xargs Before the point of Xargs being used my o/p is 01982893213982312 - RID 1 32103213213213213 - RID 2 32103213213213343 - RID 3 32103213213251261 - RID 4 For every RID present here, there is a corresponding line in File B. I am planning to do like the below after the zgrep -i xxxx FileA|grep -o "RID=[0-9|A-Z]*"|uniq|cut -d "=" -f2|xargs|{grep RID1 in file B, grep RID2 in file B,grep RID3 in file B, grep RID4 in file B} Now my only question is how will I refer RID1,2,3,4 with xargs.... –  User Jun 20 '12 at 2:49
    
I ve edited the question .. Plz look at that for better formatting –  User Jun 20 '12 at 2:51
    
Guys I have figured out the answer ... we can use the below xargs -0 -I string zcat XXXXX| agrep -dEOE string.. Thus xargs will pass the values one by one –  User Jun 20 '12 at 4:55

If the data in FileA is one RID per line, then the obvious choice is (classically) fgrep or (using the more modern notation) grep -F. POSIX un-standardized fgrep (replacing it with grep -F) in the 2004 version. However, fgrep has a very long pedigree; it was part of 7th Edition UNIX™ circa 1978, for example.

fgrep -f FileA FileB
grep -F -f FileA FileB

If the data in FileA is not in the 'one RID per line' format, make it so!


But does fgrep read i/p from console

It does if you tell it to, but you don't want it to read from the console; you want it to read from standard input. 'Console input' means 'you typing', roughly. (That said, I checked the behaviour of grep -F by using grep -F -f - /etc/passwd and then typing /bin/ on the 'console' (terminal) and then indicated EOF. It worked fine.)

If you are using bash, you can use 'process substitution' to get the result you want:

grep -F -f <(zgrep -i xxxx FileA | grep -o "RID=[0-9|A-Z]*" | uniq | cut -d "=" -f2) FileB

Process substitution runs the command inside <( ... ) so that its output goes to a 'file' (actually, a file descriptor in /dev/fd, usually), and the name is given to the command (grep) as a regular file name argument.

If you're not using bash, you can probably use this instead (and this will work OK with bash too, and may even be preferable):

zgrep -i xxxx FileA | grep -o "RID=[0-9|A-Z]*" | uniq | cut -d "=" -f2 |
grep -F -f - FileB

The lone dash means 'read from standard input' in this context; it is a common convention for commands. It works fine on Mac OS X 10.7.4; there's a strong probability it will work elsewhere too.

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Its in one RID per line ... But does fgrep read i/p from console –  User Jun 20 '12 at 2:34
    
This is the script I have written zgrep -i xxxx FileA|grep -o "RID=[0-9|A-Z]*"|uniq|cut -d "=" -f2|xargs Before the point of Xargs being used my o/p is 01982893213982312 - RID 1 32103213213213213 - RID 2 32103213213213343 - RID 3 32103213213251261 - RID 4 For every RID present here, there is a corresponding line in File B. I am planning to do like the below after the zgrep -i xxxx FileA|grep -o "RID=[0-9|A-Z]*"|uniq|cut -d "=" -f2|xargs|{grep RID1 in file B, grep RID2 in file B,grep RID3 in file B, grep RID4 in file B} Now my only question is how will I refer RID1,2,3,4 with xargs.... –  User Jun 20 '12 at 2:48
    
I ve edited the question .. Plz look at that for better formatting –  User Jun 20 '12 at 2:50

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