Dismiss
Announcing Stack Overflow Documentation

We started with Q&A. Technical documentation is next, and we need your help.

Whether you're a beginner or an experienced developer, you can contribute.

Sign up and start helping → Learn more about Documentation →

I just wanted to know if there's anything built into the .net framework where I can easily return the delta between two numbers? I wrote code that does this but it sounds like something that should be in the framework already.

share|improve this question
1  
Is this question determining whether floats are within a given range ? (otherwise it's more or less a subtraction problem... – nos Jul 10 '09 at 18:31
21  
Subtraction . . . addition's tricky pal. – Michael Jul 10 '09 at 18:34
up vote 54 down vote accepted
delta = Math.Abs(a - b);
share|improve this answer
5  
Wow...a 24 character answer netted 385 rep (and counting). That's not a bad ratio. – Aaron Jan 9 '12 at 2:39
1  
Also netted him a Reversal badge. Only 207 of these ever handed out! Nice! – Alveoli Apr 15 '15 at 9:06

I'm under the impression that "delta" is the difference between two numbers.

Until you tell me differently, I think what you want is:

delta = Math.Abs(a - b);
share|improve this answer
public static int Delta(int a, int b)
{
  int delta = 0;
  if (a == b)
  {
    return 0;
  }
  else if (a < b)
  {
    while (a < b)
    {
      a++;
      delta++;
    }
    return delta;
  }
  else
  {
    while (b < a)
    {
      b++;
      delta++;
    }
    return delta;
  }
}

:p

Oh boy, I hope no (future) employer comes across this and stops reading in disgust before he reaches the end of this post..

share|improve this answer
    
i hope you're talking about the ":P" :) – dotjoe Jul 10 '09 at 19:38
4  
While you're at it, why don't you make it recursive? stackoverflow.com/questions/1111194 – Robert Harvey Jul 10 '09 at 23:38
    
@JulianR: I revised your code, and posted a new version. – abelenky Jul 11 '09 at 2:16
    
OK. Who has the Linq version? – Robert Harvey Jul 11 '09 at 3:57
    
@Robert See daniel Earwicker's Answer – prabhakaran Aug 18 '12 at 7:24

The Linq version (requires CLR 4.0).

(cracks fingers, clears throat)

var delta = (from t in Enumerable.Range(a, a).Zip(Enumerable.Range(b, b))
            select Math.Abs(t.Item1 - t.Item2))
            .First();
share|improve this answer

Isn't that what the minus operator does? :p

share|improve this answer
2  
Not exactly but nice answer anway ;-) – Dario Jul 10 '09 at 18:32
public static int Delta(int a, int b)
{
    return a > 0? Delta(a-1, b-1) : a < 0 ? Delta(a+1, b+1) : b > 0 ? b : -b;
}

I think that's even better than @JulianR Delta implementation :-p

Edit: I didn't realize that this was already suggested by @Robert Harvey, credit to him ;-)

share|improve this answer
3  
Oh, that's much better. Recursion and chained ternary operators! – Andrew Medico Jul 11 '09 at 0:40
    
Yeah, and it even works! XD I thought that I'd have made some mistake, but surprisingly not ^_^ – fortran Jul 11 '09 at 0:53

What is the delta of two numbers? Delta has a certain meaning in set-theory and infinitesimal calculus, but this doesn't refer to numbers!

If you want to calculate the difference between two numbers a and b, you write |a - b| which is Math.Abs(a - b) in C#.

share|improve this answer
1  
Delta does not have a certain meaning in infinitesimal calculus, it is merely a commonly used symbol. – jason Jul 10 '09 at 18:51
1  
Jason, in calculus delta may refer to Diracs delta function and hence has a well defined meaning. A different definition that is widely used is Kroneckers delta. Hence Dario is right, when he asks for a clarification. The OPs question is somewhat ambiguous. – Accipitridae Jul 11 '09 at 15:46

I decided to revise JulianR's funny answer above.

The code is shorter, but perhaps more tricky:

public static int Delta(int a, int b)
{
  int delta = 0;
  while (a < b)
  {
    ++a;
    ++delta;
  }
  while (b < a)
  {
    ++b;
    ++delta;
  }
  return delta;
}

(for the humor-impaired.... this is no more serious than the bizarre question that started the thread)

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.