Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Does this code always evaluate to false? Both variables are two's complement signed ints.

~x + ~y == ~(x + y)

I feel like there should be some number that satisfies the conditions. I tried testing the numbers between -5000 and 5000 but never achieved equality. Is there a way to set up an equation to find the solutions to the condition?

Will swapping one for the other cause an insidious bug in my program?

share|improve this question
5  
Do you want a prove or something? –  Alvin Wong Jun 20 '12 at 2:18
26  
Be aware that in the cases of signed integer overflow, it is technically undefined behavior. So it's possible for it to return true even if they can never be assuming strict two's complement. –  Mysticial Jun 20 '12 at 2:18
1  
@AlvinWong yes an explanation would be nice –  Steve Jun 20 '12 at 2:21
1  
@Steve: You could demonstrate that you've tried all the usual suspects (-1, 0, 1, 2, and so on) in all combinations, as well as your attempts to "solve" the problem for small word-sizes (three bits? four bits?). That'd definitely help convince us that we're not just helping someone get something they did not try to earn for themselves first. :) –  sarnold Jun 20 '12 at 2:22
4  
@AlexLockwood When I first posted the question, I assumed tagging the question as "homework" asks people to provide clues to help me solve the problem (as the description of the "homework" tag states) and not just give answers. That's why I just plainly asked the problem's question :) –  Steve Jun 20 '12 at 3:21

11 Answers 11

up vote 233 down vote accepted

Assume for the sake of contradiction that there exists some x and some y (mod 2n) such that

~(x+y) == ~x + ~y

By two's complement*, we know that,

      -x == ~x + 1
<==>  -1 == ~x + x

Noting this result, we have,

      ~(x+y) == ~x + ~y
<==>  ~(x+y) + (x+y) == ~x + ~y + (x+y)
<==>  ~(x+y) + (x+y) == (~x + x) + (~y + y)
<==>  ~(x+y) + (x+y) == -1 + -1
<==>  ~(x+y) + (x+y) == -2
<==>  -1 == -2

Hence, a contradiction. Therefore, ~(x+y) != ~x + ~y for all x and y (mod 2n).


*It is interesting to note that on a machine with one's complement arithmetic, the equality actually holds true for all x and y. This is because under one's complement, ~x = -x. Thus, ~x + ~y == -x + -y == -(x+y) == ~(x+y).

share|improve this answer
46  
Of course, C doesn't require this behavior; as it doesn't require two's complement representation. –  Billy ONeal Jun 20 '12 at 2:43
71  
Come on, man... don't be that guy... –  Alex Lockwood Jun 20 '12 at 2:46
12  
Btw, the equality is true for one's complement. NOT operation is not really defined for number in general, so mixing NOT with addition results in different behavior depending on the representation of the number. –  nhahtdh Jun 20 '12 at 2:50
8  
One could just restate the problem to be for unsigned integers and then twos complement does not come into play at all. –  R.. Jun 20 '12 at 3:20
7  
@BillyONeal, don't worry, I was only joking and I appreciate that you mentioned it :). I'll buy you a drink on the day that I encounter a machine that performs one's complement arithmetic... how does that sound? haha –  Alex Lockwood Jun 20 '12 at 18:58

Two's Complement

On the vast majority of computers, if x is an integer, then -x is represented as ~x + 1. Equivalently, ~x == -(x + 1). Making this substution in your equation gives:

  • ~x + ~y == ~(x + y)
  • -(x+1) + -(y+1) = -((x + y) + 1)
  • -x - y - 2 = -x - y - 1
  • -2 = -1

which is a contradiction, so ~x + ~y == ~(x + y) is always false.


That said, the pedants will point out that C doesn't require two's complement, so we must also consider...

One's Complement

In one's complement, -x is simply represented as ~x. Zero is a special case, having both all-0's (+0) and all-1's (-0) representations, but IIRC, C requires +0 == -0 even if they have different bit patterns, so this shouldn't be a problem. Just substitute ~ with -.

  • ~x + ~y == ~(x + y)
  • -x + (-y) = -(x + y)

which is true for all x and y.

share|improve this answer
12  
+1 for an answer that actually considers both two's complement and one's complement on equal ground. –  Michael Kjörling Jun 20 '12 at 7:12
12  
@dan04, +0 == -0. Finally something that makes sense in C. :) –  Alex Lockwood Jun 20 '12 at 13:25

Consider only the rightmost bit of both x and y (IE. if x == 13 which is 1101 in base 2, we will only look at the last bit, a 1) Then there are four possible cases:

x = 0, y = 0:

LHS: ~0 + ~0 => 1 + 1 => 10
RHS: ~(0 + 0) => ~0 => 1

x = 0, y = 1:

LHS: ~0 + ~1 => 1 + 0 => 1
RHS: ~(0 + 1) => ~1 => 0

x = 1, y = 0:

I will leave this up to you (hint: it is the same as the previous with x and y swapped)

x = 1, y = 1:

I will leave this one up to you as well since this is homework. Although this should really be the easy part haha :)

You can show that the rightmost bit will always be different on the Left Hand Side and Right Hand Side of the equation given any possible input, so you have proven that both sides are not equal, since they have at least that one bit that is flipped from each other.

share|improve this answer

If the number of bits is n

~x = (2^n - 1) - x
~y = (2^n - 1) - y


~x + ~y = (2^n - 1) +(2^n - 1) - x - y =>  (2^n + (2^n - 1) - x - y ) - 1 => modulo: (2^n - 1) - x - y - 1.

Now,

 ~(x + y) = (2^n - 1) - (x + y) = (2^n - 1) - x - y.

Hence, they'll always be unequal, with a difference of 1.

share|improve this answer
4  
@nhahtdh and how do you define ~ operation on non-fixed width numbers? –  hamstergene Jun 20 '12 at 2:27
1  
I gave this answer with these number of bits so that it's easy to correlate with what's taught in classes. Note that ~x is highly dependent on the number of bits, n, used to represent the number. So it's sensible to stick to one, when trying to verify this experimentally. –  Karthik Kumar Viswanathan Jun 20 '12 at 2:27
1  
@hamstergene: I know that the number of bits is fixed, but my point is that it doesn't have to be those amount (8, 16, etc.). –  nhahtdh Jun 20 '12 at 2:29
1  
Those are values for which it's easy to write a program to verify the answer. It works for any n, as long as ~x and ~y are written to match that given . –  Karthik Kumar Viswanathan Jun 20 '12 at 2:30
1  
@hamstergene: I don't have problem with the proof, just that the numbers gives the false implication that it only works for those cases. –  nhahtdh Jun 20 '12 at 2:32

Hint:

x + ~x = -1 (mod 2n)

Assuming the goal of the question is testing your math (rather than your read-the-C-specifications skills), this should get you to the answer.

share|improve this answer
2  
Only on two's complement machines. (The C standard doesn't require that) –  Billy ONeal Jun 20 '12 at 2:42
2  
@BillyONeal: Hence my note at the bottom.. –  Mehrdad Jun 20 '12 at 2:56
12  
@Billy: That's like saying "only for two-armed people". –  dan04 Jun 20 '12 at 5:03
7  
@Downvoters: Care to comment? –  Mehrdad Jun 20 '12 at 5:24
3  
@Billy Whoosh! Not everyone has two arms. –  Jim Balter Jun 21 '12 at 2:20

In both one's and two's (and even in 42's) complement, this can be proved:

~x + ~y == ~(x + a) + ~(y - a)

Now let a = y and we have:

~x + ~y == ~(x + y) + ~(y - y)

or:

~x + ~y == ~(x + y) + ~0

Therefore in two's complement that ~0 = -1, the proposition is false.

In one's complement that ~0 = 0, the proposition is true.

share|improve this answer

According to the book by Dennis Ritchie, C does not implement two's complement by default. Therefore, your question might not always be true.

share|improve this answer

Letting MAX_INT be the int represented by 011111...111 (for however many bits there are). Then you know that, ~x + x = MAX_INT and ~y + y = MAX_INT, so therefore you will know for certain that the difference between ~x + ~y and ~(x + y) is 1.

share|improve this answer

C does not require that two's complement be what is implemented. However, for unsigned integer similar logics is applied. Differences will always be 1 under this logic!

share|improve this answer

Of course, C doesn't require this behavior because it no require two's complement representation. For example, ~x = (2^n - 1) - x & ~y = (2^n - 1) - y will get this result.

share|improve this answer

Ah, fundamental discrete mathematics!

Check out De Morgan's Law

~x & ~y == ~(x | y)

~x | ~y == ~(x & y)

Very important for Boolean proofs!

share|improve this answer
    
Just plain wrong. In C + is addition, * multiplication and not boolean or or and. –  nalply Jun 26 '12 at 19:37
    
Thank you for pointing out the incorrect operators, nalply. It has now been updated with the correct operators, although you are correct in that it does not apply to the original question. –  David Kaczynski Jun 27 '12 at 17:47
1  
Well, if true is one and false is zero, then + and * behave exactly as or and and, moreover two's complement behaves like not, hence the law applies nonetheless. –  a1an Jun 27 '12 at 21:56
    
Thank you for pointing that out, a1an. I was trying to think of how De Morgan's Laws could still be applicable to the original question, but it has been several years since I studied either C programming or Discrete Mathematics. –  David Kaczynski Jun 28 '12 at 16:04

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.