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My PUMP can (inflate) my BALLOON. No problem! But when I try to use my PUMP to (pop) the BALLOON, it really doesn't work very well. I can keep using my PUMP and, eventually, it will (pop) the balloon, but my arm is getting really tired, and I want to (pop) it now. So, instead, I get my POINTY STICK and (pop)! Of course, my POINT STICK is even less effective at (inflate)ing my BALLOON, than the PUMP is at (pop)ing it.

Class Balloon
{
    Private int _volume = 0;
    Private bool _popped = false;

    Public Balloon() { }

    //Restrict calling to only a PUMP object
    Internal Inflate()
    {
        if (_popped) return;

        _volume += 1;
        if (volume > 10) this.Pop();
    }

    //Restrict calling to only a POINTY STICK object
    Internal Pop()
    {
        if (!_popped) _popped = true;
    }

    Public string GirlHappiness
    { get
        {
        if (!_popped)
            {
            if (_volume < 3)
                return "......";
            if (_volume < 6)
                return "Ooohhh";                    
            else
                return "Ahhhh! Yay!";
            }
        else
            return "WaAaAaAaHhHhHh";
        }
    }

    Public string BoyHappiness
    { get
        {
        if (!_popped)
            {
            if (_volume < 3)
                return "zzzzzz";
            if (_volume < 6)
                return "zzzzzz";                    
            else
                return "zzzzzz";
            }
        else
            return "Ahahaha YAY!";
        }
    }
}

So, is there any way to achieve this? I cannot achieve the desired result via separating assemblies, and the other method I've explored, using reflection and tracing the stack, is unreliable outside of debugging. What to do?!

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1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Two ways that pop up in my mind: Use explicit interface implementation or events.

With explicit interfaces, you hide the implementation for those who do not threat the instance 'as is'. Example:

    interface IPumpable 
    {
        void Pump();
    }
    interface IPoppable
    {
        void Pop();
    }

    class Balloon :IPumpable, IPoppable
    {
        private void IPumpable.Pump()
        {
            throw new NotImplementedException();
        }   
        private void IPoppable.Pop()
        {
            throw new NotImplementedException();
        }
    }

    public static void PopMethod(IPoppable poppable)
    {
        poppable.Pop();
    }
    public static void PumpMethod(IPumpable pumpable)
    {
        pumpable.Pump();
    }

    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        Balloon balloon = new Balloon();

        PumpMethod((IPumpable)balloon);
        PopMethod((IPoppable)balloon);
    }

Note that the Pump and Pop implementations can be marked private. They are only visible when you threat the balloon as IPumpable or IPoppable respectively.

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