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I'm building a version control module for my network and this is what I have so far:

import os, plistlib
def cyberduck():
    path=('/Applications/Cyberduck.app/Contents/Info.plist')
    pl = plistlib.readPlist(path)
    pl['key']=0
        for key in pl.values():
            if (key=='4.2.1'):
                print("We're good!")
            else:
                print("No good")
                import cyberduck_install

The loop will find the version string('4.2.1'), but will also find all the non version strings. How do I code the loop so that if ('4.2.1') exists it will return true and only print ("We're good!") and if ('4.2.1') does not exist anywhere, it will return false and only print ("No good") once?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Am I missing something? Is this all you want:

if '4.2.1' in pl.values():
   print ("We're good!")
else:
   print ("No good")
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Thanks happydave! That worked perfectly. I'm not sure why I couldn't think outside of that for loop. –  Fuhton Jun 20 '12 at 10:46

happydave's answer is almost certainly your best option for all kinds of good reasons. But, purely for completeness, this slight modification to the code in the question will work:

for key in pl.values():
    if (key=='4.2.1'):
        print("We're good!")
        break
else:
    print("No good")

This works because Python loops (both for and while) allow an else: clause, which triggers when you fall off the end of the loop, but not if you exit it with a break.

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