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I want to find files containing the word "navbar" anywhere in files. I can do this using Mac's grep command like this:

grep -R "navbar" *

What's its equivalent in PowerShell 1.0?

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1  
Just an FYI, the path %windir%\system32\windowspowershell\v1.0 doesn't mean you have powershell 1.0 - this is an unfortunate side effect of an earlier botched versioning decision. This is the location for powershell 1, 2 and 3 (the latest as of right now.) - to see the powershell version, examine $psversiontable variable. If it does not exist, you have 1.0. If it does exist, look at the PSVersion property. –  x0n Jun 20 '12 at 14:32

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted
findstr /s "navbar" *

It's a native command but should work well enough.

PowerShell 1.0 itself is a little tricky, as Select-String (the direct equivalent) only exists since 2.0, I think. So you'd have to make do with something like:

Get-ChildItem -Recurse |
  ForEach-Object {
    $file = $_
    ($_ | Get-Content) -cmatch 'navbar' |
      ForEach-Object { $file.Name + ':' + $_ }
  }

Short version:

ls -r|%{$f=$_;($_|gc)-cmatch'navbar'|%{$f.Name+":$_"}}

This is quite literally:

  1. Find all files recursively (the -R part).
  2. Read each file and print matching lines with their file name.
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3  
Oh my God! poor window users.. –  coure2011 Jun 20 '12 at 5:45
5  
Erm, poor users of outdated software. Install PowerShell v2 please. And findstr works. The rest was just to emulate its output. If you're only interested in the file where navbar appears (and not the line where it does) then gci -r|?{(gc $_)-cmatch'navbar'} does that. –  Joey Jun 20 '12 at 6:16
2  
Just an FYI, the path %windir%\system32\windowspowershell\v1.0 doesn't mean you have powershell 1.0 - this is an unfortunate side effect of an earlier botched versioning decision. This is the location for powershell 1, 2 and 3 (the latest as of right now.) - to see the powershell version, examine $psversiontable variable. If it does not exist, you have 1.0. If it does exist, look at the PSVersion property –  x0n Jun 20 '12 at 14:32
1  
Additionally, you could only have 1.0 if you're running server 2003 or windows xp (which I hope you're not!) –  x0n Jun 20 '12 at 14:33
    
Or Windows Vista :-) –  Joey Jun 20 '12 at 16:29

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