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I have a series of if statements in a function like this:

if time == "%%00":
    #code
elif time == "%%15":
    #code
elif time == "%%30":
    #code
elif time == "%%45":
    #code

Where time is 24 hour format ie. 0000-2400 and I'm checking what 15 interval time is at. All the statements are ignored however, so "%%interval" doesn't work. Is it just something simple I'm missing here or do I need a different method?

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2  
Have a look at regex. –  phg Jun 20 '12 at 5:44
    
See the re module. –  Joachim Pileborg Jun 20 '12 at 5:47
2  
What in the world would make you think % is some kind of crazy string wildcard in Python (or that equality tests accept wildcards to begin with)? –  kindall Jun 20 '12 at 5:50
    
I've been doing my first semester of sql at the same time and it uses % in statements such as WHERE str LIKE "%asd%". I thought it'd work similarly in python. –  Markaj Jun 20 '12 at 5:54

2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

There are several ways to do it:

if time.endswith("00"):
    #code
elif time[-2:] == "15":
    #code
elif re.match(".{2}30", time):
    #code
elif time.endswith("45"):
    #code
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Nice answer, +1 (office time e boisha boisha amne answer korle mara khaba kintuk :P) –  Sayem Ahmed Jul 2 '12 at 6:50

fundamentally you are comparing string literals and nothing more, theres a couple ways of doing this, heres one without regular expressions.

if   time[-2:] == "00":
    #code
elif time[-2:] == "15":
    #code
elif time[-2:] == "30":
    #code
elif time[-2:] == "45":
    #code

[-2:] will grab the last two chars from the string

heres one with regular expression, Im not a big fan of them, they can generate subtle bugs, but thats just my opinion.

if re.match('..00', time):
    #code
elif re.match('..15', time):
    # code
elif re.match('..30', time):
    # code
elif re.match('..45', time):
    # code

the . simply means match any char, except for \n, re.match either returns an object or None if there was no match.

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