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I understand that storage history is something that is better to keep for vcs and I know that git allows to clone not the full history log but:

  • I afraid GitHub space is limited (main reason)
  • it's auto-commits processing by script
  • I'm interesting only in last 10 or 5 commits in history
  • server space could be limited

Yet I can't fully form the idea why do I want it but I shell try: I want to fork this (automated) repository and use git merge (yes, as a tool) to work on it and keep myself update with upstream. So in this case I will use git right. ideally I must make what "git merge" makes without having this automated upstream repository but it's another task.

For now I found only that tricky way to clean all the history using git rebase

git checkout --orphan temp $1
git commit -m "Truncated history"
git rebase --onto temp $1 origin/master
git checkout master
git branch -D temp

But that is as complex as useless, it's easier to create new repository and push files directly there. So need something to keep git repository history small.

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closed as not constructive by casperOne Jun 21 '12 at 13:27

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1  
"auto-commits processing by script" ? "only in last 10 or 5 commits in history" ? Are you sure git is the correct tool for you ? You don't seem to use it as a vcs. –  dystroy Jun 20 '12 at 6:38
    
Not, I'm not sure. but it's another question. I realize that I need to think about alternatives. –  Heather Jun 20 '12 at 6:42
    
That something is complex doesn't make it useless. Often it's the other way around. If you have found that the commands are what you need, create a script which performs the task for you. Abracadabra, complexity gone. –  tripleee Jun 20 '12 at 7:32

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

What you do is very wrong.

A VCS helps you keep the history of your code, merge the work of the coder(s), manage branchs, retrieve old versions, find the origins of a bug, test a new strategy, and so on. It's useful in backuping your code too but that's far from its sole function.

You just seem to be interested in git as a tool to save your recent work. That's not at all what git is dedicated to.

And your arguments aren't valid. If you store only your code (and parameterization and small resources) in git, you won't risk exploding github storage space nor any kind of server space. I have many projects on git, with many coders, and the occupied space is negligible. You shouldn't try to erase history just to save space.

If you're coding, use git normally, respect its best practice, you won't regret it as it is a very valuable tool.

share|improve this answer
    
Yet I can't fully form the idea why do I want it but I shell try: I want to fork this (automated) repository and use git merge (yes, as a tool) to work on it and keep myself update with upstream. So in this case I will use git right. ideally I must make what "git merge" makes without having this automated upstream repository but it's another task. –  Heather Jun 20 '12 at 6:56
    
I'm not sure I get you. But a comment : you don't have to use merge if you're the sole coder and don't make branchs. To send to the server, clone your repository, put the cloned repository on your server (or github) and after that use push to send your local commited work to this distant repository. –  dystroy Jun 20 '12 at 7:00
    
I fork git repository from rsync to fork it for myself and keep myself up-to-date with it. –  Heather Jun 20 '12 at 7:02

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