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Have a really large table consisting of 8 fields (I know, unprecise).

In my application I run this SELECT repeatedly:

SELECT d1, time, s1, s2 from Collection WHERE (d1 = 1) and (s1 = 1) and (time BETWEEN 5666300000 AND 566630700);

I run this SELECT with different time ranges. d1 is a field with 200-300 different values, same with s1. Primary keys are d1, time, s1.

I'm looking for tips on optimizing my table structure and query. The thing is that the time field is not in ascending/descending order. So this can be a query requiring some time. I was wondering about indexing my time field. Would I then have to change my query? I that case, how?

Is there any obv wrong with my query I'm not seeing? This runs slow in my application. Thanks!

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Note, that it is considered bad practice to use time values in unique (in your case: primary) keys. –  npe Jun 20 '12 at 7:27
    
Ok, thx. Any idea what changes I can make? Btw, any PRAGMA settings that can make this repeatdly query faster in general? –  Ole-M Jun 20 '12 at 7:30
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3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I woild recommend building your clustered index (primary key) on time + d1 + s1 (in that order). This will ensure that the data is physically stored in order of time and then d1 and s1

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I disagree on the order of the primary key proposed in other answers.

Your ideal scenario (for you exact example query) is to have all the relevant records next to each other. This will enable a single seek on your data. For example, using (d1, s1, time) as a clustered primary key, you would have data stored as follows...

 d1 | s1 | time 
----+----+------
  1 |  1 | 1234
  1 |  1 | 1235    \
  1 |  1 | 1236     SELECT * FROM table WHERE d1 = 1 AND s1 = 1 AND time BETWEEN 1235 AND 1237
  1 |  1 | 1237    /
  1 |  1 | 1238
  1 |  2 | 1234
  1 |  2 | 1235
  1 |  2 | 1236
  1 |  2 | 1237
  1 |  2 | 1238

If, as suggested by others, you have time as the first field in your clustered index, you do not get all your data in one continiguous block. Instead you get a single seek for each individual time value...

 time | d1 | s1
------+----+----
 1234 |  1 |  1     *Desired Row 1
 1234 |  1 |  2
 1235 |  1 |  1     *Desired Row 2
 1235 |  1 |  2
 1236 |  1 |  1     *Desired Row 3
 1236 |  1 |  2
 1237 |  1 |  1     *Desired Row 4
 1237 |  1 |  2
 1238 |  1 |  1     *Desired Row 5
 1238 |  1 |  2

This structure is actually very good for a different query...

SELECT * FROM yourTable WHERE time = 1234 AND d1 = 1 AND s2 BETWEEN 2 AND 3

This demonstrates that theree is no single universally perfect clustered index. So, how do you chose what to make clustered, as you can only have one clustered index?

It depends on your data and your queries. For each query you need to look at how many different contiguous blocks of data you're going to be pulling out. Trying to minimise the number of these blocks is a very good idea. But so is maintaining the order of the data so that it fits you GROUP BY or ORDER by clauses. JOINs compound this further.

For your example query, the first index I suggested really will be the best. But not for all your queries.

Also, you need to consider fragmentation. Data is stored in pages, and you need to consider the way in which your data will be inserted (treat an update as a delete and an insert when thinking about this). Because it is likely that any insert will normally be for a newer time value than the existing data, having time first in the clustered index will reduce fragmentation.

For example, pretend each page can only hold three rows of data. The two indexes suggested above look like this...

 d1 | s1 | time            time | d1 | s1 
----+----+------          ------+----+----
  1 |  1 | 1234 \          1234 |  1 |  1   \
  1 |  1 | 1235  Page 1    1234 |  1 |  2    Page 1
  1 |  1 | 1236 /          1235 |  1 |  1   /
----+----+------          ------+----+----
  1 |  1 | 1237 \          1235 |  1 |  2   \
  1 |  1 | 1238  Page 2    1236 |  1 |  1    Page 2
  1 |  2 | 1234 /          1236 |  1 |  2   /
----+----+------          ------+----+----
  1 |  2 | 1235 \          1237 |  1 |  1   \
  1 |  2 | 1236  Page 3    1237 |  1 |  2    Page 3
  1 |  2 | 1237 /          1238 |  1 |  1   /
----+----+------          ------+----+----
  1 |  2 | 1238 -Page 4    1238 |  1 |  2   -Page 4

Now, try to insert d1 = 1, s1 = 1, time = 1239.

 d1 | s1 | time            time | d1 | s1 
----+----+------          ------+----+----
  1 |  1 | 1234 \          1234 |  1 |  1   \
  1 |  1 | 1235  Page 1    1234 |  1 |  2    Page 1
  1 |  1 | 1236 /          1235 |  1 |  1   /
----+----+------          ------+----+----
  1 |  1 | 1237 \          1235 |  1 |  2   \
  1 |  1 | 1238  Page 2    1236 |  1 |  1    Page 2
 *1 |  1 | 1239*/          1236 |  1 |  2   /
----+----+------          ------+----+----
  1 |  2 | 1234 -Page 3    1237 |  1 |  1   \
----+----+------           1237 |  1 |  2    Page 3
  1 |  2 | 1235 \          1238 |  1 |  1   /
  1 |  2 | 1236  Page 4   ------+----+---- 
  1 |  2 | 1237 /          1238 |  1 |  2   -Page 4
----+----+------           1239 |  1 |  1   /
  1 |  2 | 1238 -Page 5

The version on the left had to create a new page. The version on the right just continued to fill an existing page.

When fragmentation arises there are often maintenance plans that can remedy the fragmentation. This is often an over night process.

It's all a bit complicated isn't it? Well, there are whole books just on this topic.

I wouldn't normally worry too much about fragmentation until it becomes a problem. But it really is something worth keeping in mind.

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What a decent effort!! :O –  Andrius Naruševičius Jun 20 '12 at 8:10
    
Would adding indexes by saying: CREATE INDEX time_indx ON Collection(time); improve the performance on the select query? Or explicitly adding indexes on any other columns? –  Ole-M Jun 20 '12 at 9:08
    
@Ole-M - Three Indexes on one column each is funadmentally different from One Index on three columns. Whether your suggestion will help will depend on what indexes already exist, whether SQLite can merge indexes when generating plans and a whole host of other factors. [The simple answer is to try it and see.] If you really want best possible performance on WHERE d1 = ? AND s2 = ? AND time BETWEEN ? AND ? then create ONE index on (d1, s2, time) in that order. (This is a huge topic, too big for one SO question.) –  MatBailie Jun 20 '12 at 9:48
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First of all, as npe said, you shouldn't use time as Primary. I think that adding primary indices on time - d1 - s1. This way you will have time as kind of main primary index and thus all the betweens will be really fast. And only then will come the d1 and s1. Moreover, put d1 and s1 in as small data type as possible. If it is only 1 and 0, put it into bool and so on. This would speed up the checks.

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What about PRAGMA-settings? Increasing cache_size to something bigger? –  Ole-M Jun 20 '12 at 7:46
    
Have you tried? –  Andrius Naruševičius Jun 20 '12 at 8:25
    
yep, tried to set it to 5000. Didn't get me any better performance. I thought that could help, but it clearly did not. Have looked at other options like synchronous = off, temp_store = memory and journal_mode = memory. But I haven't noticed any increased performance from that. –  Ole-M Jun 20 '12 at 8:51
    
Are you speaking of the primary key that you had or that I suggested that you applied the settings to? –  Andrius Naruševičius Jun 20 '12 at 9:32
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