Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Is there any interaction between applets and their hosting browser when making HTTP requests, or are requests made completely independently of native browser code?

Specifically, do Java applets running in a browser have some implicit way of sharing the browser's session state and cache?

I've read a few posts from non-authoritative sources saying that when an applet makes an HTTP request that it will use the browser's cache, and that it will also have access (somehow) to the browser's cookies.

Tests I've done using URLConnection suggest that this is not the case, and my gut feeling is that it sounds far too convenient to be true. I would assume that nothing in the JVM knows anything about the world outside of that JVM, meaning the only other way this could work would be if the JVM implementation is specific to the browser its implementation of the URL-related methods delegate to native browser code?

If cookie data is not implicitly shared or available, is best practice to pass a session ID in a param tag to the applet? Are there security concerns with this approach? If the applet doesn't use the browser's cache for requests, how does caching requests in an applet work?

share|improve this question
    
Possible duplicate –  npe Jun 20 '12 at 7:45
    
" I would assume that nothing in the JVM knows anything about the world outside of that JVM, meaning the only other way this could work would be if the JVM implementation is specific to the browser its implementation of the URL-related methods delegate to native browser code?" - I think your assumption is right. For your caching related query, see stackoverflow.com/questions/10103477/caching-in-java-applets –  Suresh Kumar Jun 20 '12 at 8:53

4 Answers 4

I think it depends on the Java plugin. My experience is that usually it uses the browser cache for network connections, and usually it transmits the cookies. I have had to empty the browser cache before to get a new file in an applet.

If you look at the Oracle Java 7 Plugin Control Panel, you will see an option in the network parameters to use direct connections for the applets, but the default is to use "browser parameters".

As for the cookies, I have seen in the past some Java plugins that did not transmit the session cookies, in particular on MacOS X (Apple even suggested a workaround). But most developers now assume that they are transmitted, and in practice it usually works.

share|improve this answer
    
Would you expect a session ID to get appended to the HTTP request when using Firefox/IE9 and a URLConnection? That didn't work in my case. –  Deejay Jun 20 '12 at 8:40
    
I would expect it if the session ID is in a cookie. If it's in the URL, well, the URL would just have to be complete. If it doesn't work for you, I don't know why. –  Damien Jun 20 '12 at 9:12

Applets are executed by the Java Plugin, which is a browser plugin. The applet is indeed part of an HTML page loaded by the browser, can communicate with the browser DOM and with JavaScript code in the page, and uses the browser to send requests to its originating server.

See http://docs.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/deployment/applet/appletExecutionEnv.html and http://docs.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/deployment/applet/server.html for more information.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! I think you've pasted the same link twice. –  Deejay Jun 20 '12 at 9:07
    
Oops. Sorry. I've fixed it now. –  JB Nizet Jun 20 '12 at 9:10
1  
"uses the browser to send requests" isn't supported by empirical testing I've done - requests are made by the JVM directly using HttpUrlConnection –  Deejay Apr 30 '13 at 12:20
up vote 2 down vote accepted

My testing with Windows 7, Java 1.6.23 and Firefox, Chrome and Internet Explorer is that HttpURLConnections from within an applet's JVM interact in no way with the browser. They don't use the cache, and don't have cookie headers added.

share|improve this answer
    
Confirmed - I recently added Spring Security to a site that which contains an applet that accesses secured resources on the site. The applet no longer works, since it's missing the authentication token in the cookie. –  mdma Oct 22 '12 at 8:37

Applets do not share the session information by default, but you can pass the session ID via Applet parameter while initializing. And use the session ID for each HTTP request.

share|improve this answer
    
right now i am passing session id as a parameter of applet and using this session id for authentication when any request made via applet to server. after some searching i read your suggestion but my question to you is is there any security risk using this approach ? –  Mihir May 25 '13 at 4:28

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.