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<?php
$sTable = "mytable";    

$colUpdate = $_GET['field'];// database field name
$valUpdate = $_GET['val']; // the long string ,can be non-English   
$rowID = $_GET['id']; //number

    $pdo = PDO2::getInstance();
    $pdo->exec('SET NAMES utf8'); // for utf-8

    $sql = "UPDATE $sTable
            SET $colUpdate =:valUpdate
            WHERE id =:rowID ";      
    $req = $pdo->prepare($sql);
    $req->bindValue(":valUpdate",  $valUpdate);
    $req->bindValue(":rowID",  $rowID);

    $req->execute();
    $req->closeCursor();        
   ?>

What did I wrong here?Because it works if I did like this:

 <?php
    $sTable = "mytable";
    $pdo = PDO2::getInstance();
    $colUpdate = $_GET['field'];
    $valUpdate = $_GET['val'];      
    $rowID = $_GET['id'];

    $sQuery = " UPDATE $sTable SET  $colUpdate = '$valUpdate' WHERE  id = $rowID";
    $req = $pdo->prepare($sQuery);
    $req->execute();
    $req->closeCursor();    
?>
share|improve this question
6  
What you did wrong: you posted a question without describing the problem and you did not include any errors you're getting. –  lanzz Jun 20 '12 at 7:48
3  
You are not doing any error checking for your query in your code. It is hence no wonder the code breaks when your query fails. See stackoverflow.com/questions/3726505/… on how to get an error message out of PDO –  Pekka 웃 Jun 20 '12 at 7:48
1  
Between the last bindValue and execute() lines in the first codebox, put in this: $err = $req->errorInfo(); echo $err[2]; and tell us what it says. –  Zane Bien Jun 20 '12 at 8:12
1  
Did you try to specify the kind of parameter you bind with: PDO::PARAM_STR or PDO::PARAM_INT ? –  stUrb Jun 20 '12 at 8:21
1  
By the way, the fact that you are inserting $colUpdate directly into the query completely defeats the purpose of using prepared statements. It is derived straight from $_GET without any filtration or validation, and thus you are a wide open call for SQL injection attack. The best thing to do for this would be to pass $_GET['field'] through a switch() statement with the cases being the names of your tables. This would essentially force $colUpdate to be either of the cases in the switch and nothing else. Please do this for the sake of your security! –  Zane Bien Jun 20 '12 at 8:48

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

There are several issues in your code:

  1. You are using a Singleton
  2. You aren't checking for errors
  3. You're passing GET variables directly.

Let's address each, shall we?

1. You are using a Singleton

Singletons are evil, they are set in the global space, which makes your application unstable, unreliable and untestable. Besides, what would you do if you needed another database connection?

Solution

Use a new PDO instance.

2. You aren't checking for errors

There aren't any error checking in your code, so if an error does come up, it is silently ignored.

Solution

Set PDO::ATTR_ERRMODE to PDO::ERRMODE_EXCEPTION in the constructor of PDO or using setAttribute. It also helps setting PDO::EMULATE_PREPARES to false.

3. You're passing GET variables directly into your query

You're passing $colUpdate directly inside your query, even if you are preparing the statement, variables passed directly into the query strings are not escaped.

Solution

Pass it in a placeholder, and bind the value. Also, your structure is most likely flawed if you need user input to determine the column you're updating.

After all of those, I come to the following code:

<?php
/*
 * Variable Initialization
 */
/** @var $table_name string Name of the table to insert */
$table_name = "mytable";

/**
 * @var $field_to_update string Name of field to update
 * @deprecated Should not be used! Database restructuring needed!
 */
$field_to_update = mysql_real_escape_string($_GET['field']); //At least escape it!

/** @var $value_to_insert string */
$value_to_insert = $_GET['val'];

/** @var $row_id integer */
$row_id = $_GET['id'];

$pdo = new PDO("mysql:host=localhost;dbname=database_name", "user", "password");
$pdo->setAttribute(PDO::ATTR_ERRMODE, PDO::ERRMODE_EXCEPTION);
$pdo->setAttribute(PDO::ATTR_EMULATE_PREPARES, false);
$pdo->exec('SET NAMES utf8'); // for utf-8

$sql = <<<MySQL
UPDATE $table_name
    SET $field_to_update = :valUpdate
    WHERE id = :rowID
MySQL;

$req = $pdo->prepare($sql);
$req->bindValue(":valUpdate", $value_to_insert, PDO::PARAM_STR);
$req->bindValue(":rowID", $row_id, PDO::PARAM_INT);

$req->execute();
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Thanks for explanation.it is very clear to me, –  sophie Jun 28 '12 at 12:51

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