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Why is this printing out 0 back in main but 6 when it is inside of the strcmp function?

  7 int main()
  8 {
  9 char* str = "test string";
 10 char* str2 = "test strong";
 11 //printf("string length = %d\n",strlen(str));
 12 
 13 int num = strcmp(str,str2);
 14 
 15 printf("num = %d\n",num);
 16 }




 29 int strcmp(char* str, char* str2)
 30 {
 31   if(*str == '\0' && *str2 == '\0')
 32     return 0;
 33   if(*str2 - *str == 0)
 34   {
 35     strcmp(str+1,str2+1);
 36   }
 37   else
 38   {
 39     int num = *str2 - *str;
 40     cout << "num = " <<num<<endl;
 41     return num;
 42     }
 43 }

The output is:

num = 6 num = 0

Why is it printing 0 when obviously the value that it should be returning is 6?

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You should use the debugger (or add print statements) to trace the flow of your program, and identify where it goes wrong. –  Oliver Charlesworth Jun 20 '12 at 8:50
2  
You're not returning the recursive call. –  Ja͢ck Jun 20 '12 at 8:50
    
I am using print statements. I have a print statement right before the function returns. And a print statement right after. But the values are different. –  ordinary Jun 20 '12 at 8:52
    
Oh okay, I just returned the recursive call, and it worked. Would you be willing to explain to me what happens when I don't do that? Why it won't work if I just call the function without returning it? Shouldn't it still return num? Thanks –  ordinary Jun 20 '12 at 8:53
    
As a minor note, please note that you can't legally name your function strcmp(), the space of functions whose names start with str is reserved. –  unwind Jun 20 '12 at 8:55

3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Did you forget to add a return statement?

 33 if(*str2 - *str == 0)
 34   {
 35     return strcmp(str+1,str2+1);
 36   }

Otherwise, the code will just skip past the rest of your if statement and reach the end of your function, returning nothing (or 0 in your case, but that's being lucky).

Your code will only work if the first characters of both strings are different from each other. Or if both strings are empty.

Your compiler should warn you about this; returning void from non void function. If not, you should compile with -Wall :)

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1  
Not by default :-( -Wall will enable it though. (or explicitly with -Wreturn-type) –  jedwards Jun 20 '12 at 8:53
1  
@jedwards I always compile with -Wall :) thanks! I've updated the answer. –  Ja͢ck Jun 20 '12 at 8:56
    
So what happens when there is no return? Can someone please explain it to me. I think I have some idea but I don't see how it ends up returning 0 –  ordinary Jun 20 '12 at 9:00
    
@AvanishGiri I have that in my answer, after your strcmp is called it will exit the if statement and reach the end of your function. –  Ja͢ck Jun 20 '12 at 9:03
    
Oh, okay. So does it create a stack, which has a 6 on top and eight 0's on the bottom, and eventually it returns all of these but the last value returned is a 0 and that's what gets finally returned to my main function? Is that what is going on? Pardon my ignorance. –  ordinary Jun 20 '12 at 9:09

This is the problem:

if(*str2 - *str == 0)
{ 
    strcmp(str+1,str2+1); /* no return here. */
}

meaning the code will drop through to end, where there is no return, which is undefined behaviour:

  • From section 6.9.1 Function definitions of the C99 standard:

If the } that terminates a function is reached, and the value of the function call is used by the caller, the behavior is undefined.

  • From section 6.6.3 The return statement of the C++03 standard:

Flowing off the end of a function is equivalent to a return with no value; this results in undefined behavior in a value-returning function.

As the behaviour is undefined anything can occur. In this case 0 is returned.

Change to:

if(*str2 - *str == 0)
{ 
    return strcmp(str+1,str2+1);
}
share|improve this answer
    
So what happens when there is no return? Can someone please explain it to me. I think I have some idea but I don't see how it ends up returning 0 –  ordinary Jun 20 '12 at 9:00
    
@AvanishGiri, I am pretty sure it is undefined behaviour, checking standard to confirm this... –  hmjd Jun 20 '12 at 9:04
    
@AvanishGiri, updated answer. It is undefined behaviour. –  hmjd Jun 20 '12 at 9:20

You need a return in every branch.

If I understand correctly, and there are quite a few questions around here that exhibit the same idea, you're assuming that a return from a recursive function call "ends" the recursion and returns a value to the top level; that is, it becomes the result of the first function call (similarly to how break would work in a loop).
It ain't so.

This is a bit long, but I have a terrible cold and I'm bored, so bear with me (if I'm rambling it's the fever talking).

Suppose you had these for adding 2 to a number:

int add1(int x) { return x + 1; }
int add2(int y) { return add1(y + 1); } 

Very silly functions, but nothing out of the ordinary otherwise; to get the value of add2(78), we first compute the value add1(79) and then we return that.
I'm sure you agree that

int add2(int y) { add1(y + 1); } 

just wouldn't work - it returns nothing (which in practice usually means "whatever happened to be lying around where the returned value should have been stored". Or zero.)

Let's expand your code in a ridiculously stupid way:

int strcmp2(char* str, char* str2);

int strcmp(char* str, char* str2)
{
  if(*str == '\0' && *str2 == '\0')
    return 0;
  if(*str2 - *str == 0)
  {
    strcmp2(str+1,str2+1);
  }
  else
  {
    int num = *str2 - *str;
    cout << "num = " <<num<<endl;
    return num;
    }
}

int strcmp2(char* str, char* str2)
{
  if(*str == '\0' && *str2 == '\0')
    return 0;
  if(*str2 - *str == 0)
  {
    strcmp(str+1,str2+1);
  }
  else
  {
    int num = *str2 - *str;
    cout << "num = " <<num<<endl;
    return num;
    }
}

All I've done is make another almost identical function, and instead of doing straight recursion, they take turns in calling each other (this is called mutual recursion).
Would you expect this code to work? No? I thought not.

This is the secret of recursion:
Recursive functions are no different from other functions.

If you don't return anything from a function, nothing will be returned.
If a function is supposed to return something, you'd better always return something.

That's it. There is no recursion magic going on that makes a recursive function different from any other function. There is no "shortcut return" out of a recursive function.

The way to understand recursion is to realise that there is nothing special about it - it's just one function calling another function.

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