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I am writing simple parallel program in C++ using OpenMP. I am working on Windows 7 and on Microsoft Visual Studio 2010 Ultimate. I changed the Language property of the project to "Yes/OpenMP" to support OpenMP

Here I provide the code:

#include <iostream>
#include <omp.h> 

using namespace std;

double sum; 
int i;
int n = 800000000;

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{               
    omp_set_dynamic(0);
    omp_set_num_threads(4); 

    sum = 0;    
    #pragma omp for reduction(+:sum)
    for (i = 0; i < n; i++)
        sum+= i/(n/10);

    cout<<"sum="<<sum<<endl;        

    return  EXIT_SUCCESS;
}

But, I couldn't get any acceleration by changing the x in omp_set_num_threads(x); It doesn't matter if I use OpenMp or not, the calculating time is the same, about 7 seconds.

Does Someone know what is the problem?

share|improve this question
    
Be that as it may, I’m pretty sure there’s a closed formula for this calculation. And in fact, you are probably missing a cast, because as it is written at the moment, all is < 80000000 will be truncated to 0. –  Konrad Rudolph Jun 20 '12 at 9:00
1  
If you want speed, then rule No1 is to avoid unnecessary computations, for example in your inner loop replace sum += i/(n/10) with sum += i*d; and declare const double d=10.0/n; before. A clever compiler may optimize this anyway, but best not rely on that (the compiler may for example optimize to a division by a constant, which is significantly less efficient). –  Walter Jun 20 '12 at 9:59
    
I would suggest that you forget about omp_set_num_threads() and instead set the environment variable OMP_NUM_THREADS. Otherwise you might distribute your program with number of threads fixed to a much higher value than the CPU count of the machine where it will actually be running on. –  Hristo Iliev Jun 20 '12 at 12:20

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Your pragma statement is missing the parallel specifier:

#include <iostream>
#include <omp.h> 

using namespace std;

double sum; 
int i;
int n = 800000000;

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{               
    omp_set_dynamic(0);
    omp_set_num_threads(4); 

    sum = 0;    
    #pragma omp parallel for reduction(+:sum)  //  add "parallel"
    for (i = 0; i < n; i++)
        sum+= i/(n/10);

    cout<<"sum="<<sum<<endl;        

    return  EXIT_SUCCESS;
}

Sequential:

sum=3.6e+009
2.30071

Parallel:

sum=3.6e+009
0.618365

Here's a version that some speedup with Hyperthreading. I had to increase the # of iterations by 10x and bump the datatypes to long long:

double sum; 
long long i;
long long n = 8000000000;

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{               
    omp_set_dynamic(0);
    omp_set_num_threads(8); 

    double start = omp_get_wtime();


    sum = 0;    
    #pragma omp parallel for reduction(+:sum)
    for (i = 0; i < n; i++)
        sum+= i/(n/10);

    cout<<"sum="<<sum<<endl;       

    double end = omp_get_wtime(); 
    cout << end - start << endl;
    system("pause");

    return  EXIT_SUCCESS;
}

Threads: 1

sum=3.6e+014
13.0541

Threads: 2

sum=3.6e+010
6.62345

Threads: 4

sum=3.6e+010
3.85687

Threads: 8

sum=3.6e+010
3.285
share|improve this answer
    
very niche! I got acceleration in time!) –  Nurlan Jun 20 '12 at 9:15
1  
@NurlanKenzhebekov I've updated my answer with a version that shows some Hyperthreading speedup on my own quad-core Core i7 machine. It still isn't 4x, but 8 threads shows some improvement over 4 threads. –  Mysticial Jun 20 '12 at 9:48

Apart from the error pointed out by Mystical, you seemed to assume that openMP can justs to magic. It can at best use all cores on your machine. If you have 2 cores, it may reduce the execution time by two if you call omp_set_num_threads(np) with np>=2, but for np much larger than the number of cores, the code will be inefficient due to parallelization overheads.

The example from Mystical was apparently run on at least 4 cores with np=4.

share|improve this answer
    
My machine has 4 physical cores and it supports 8 threads because in task manager I see 8 columns of CPU loading. But even if I set np=8 I couldn't get acceleration more than 3.9...Can you explain why I couldn't get acceleration more than 4 even I have 8 columns of CPU loading? –  Nurlan Jun 20 '12 at 9:29
1  
@NurlanKenzhebekov That's because Hyperthreading isn't useful in this particular example. From what I've seen before, code that runs mostly integer divisions don't benefit much (if at all) from Hyperthreading. –  Mysticial Jun 20 '12 at 9:32
1  
@Nurlan yes, your code is limited by computations not data loading and storing, so more threads than cores doesn't help. If you're code were data-limited, then each thread did little computations most of the time and hyperthreading would be benefitial. –  Walter Jun 20 '12 at 9:42

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